GCVS Flex Course Catalog and Program of Studies

Online education technology that works on a flexible schedule

Program of Studies

The GCVS Flex Program utilizes the Edgenuity platform, curriculum, and instructional resources to deliver an unparalleled flexible education that meets all Massachusetts state standards. Designed for students to work on their own schedule, when and where learning works best for them through the curriculum, there is no live lesson requirement. Students work with and communicate with teachers who support them as they progress through their coursework.

GCVS Flex courses mirror the rigor and structure of more typical classroom courses. Students in the Flex Program have more control over their schedules and pacing, while maintaining a high level of commitment in order to be successful. Below, you’ll find the course catalog of classes currently offered in the GCVS Flex program using Edgenuity technology and curriculum. This will be updated from time to time, and we encourage you to check back to see what’s new.

GCVS Flex Middle School and High School programs offer a wide variety of courses that meet state standards and are taught by certified teachers. Guidance counselors work with students at all levels to help design an appropriate course of study that will meet their goals and help them achieve success.

GCVS Flex High School Courses

English Language Arts

English Language Arts 9

Course Description

This freshman-year English course invites students to explore diverse texts organized into thematic units. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.”

They will study also short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the routine and process of writing.
  • Learn to use Standard English from a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Mythology
Unit 2: The Epic Hero’s Quest
Unit 3: Individuality and Conformity
Unit 4: Independence and the Bicycle
Unit 5: Nature and the Environment
Unit 6: Making a Difference
Unit 7: Caring
Unit 8: Tragedy and Drama
Unit 9: Mystery and Suspense
Unit 10: Espionage and Intrigue
Unit 11: Fighting for Equality
Unit 12: Unity and Division

English Language Arts 10 Honors

Course Description

This sophomore-year English course provides engaging and rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry to strengthen knowledge of language arts. Honors reading lessons require analyzing complex texts, while concise mini-lessons advance writing and research skills to craft strong, compelling essays and projects.

Students will write argumentative and analytical essays based on literary texts, as well as an informative research paper using MLA style. Throughout the course, students read a range of classic and contemporary literary texts including Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. In addition to reading a wide range of literary texts, students read and analyze complex informational and argumentative texts including Sonia Sotomayor’s “A Latina Judge’s Voice,” Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, and the contemporary informational text Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational and contemporary works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the routine and process of writing.
  • Learn to use Standard English from a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are listed below:

Unit 1: Stories from around the World
Unit 2: Life-Changing Journeys
Unit 3: Sugar Changed the World
Unit 4: The Power of Humor
Unit 5: Animal Farm
Unit 6: The Human Experience
Unit 7: Striving for Equality
Unit 8: The Language of Leaders
Unit 9: The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Unit 10: Globalization and the Future

English Language Arts 12

Course Description

This senior-year English Language Arts course invites you to explore a diverse collection of texts organized into thematic units. You will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of both classic and contemporary literature. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, you will learn comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Tasks will encourage you to strengthen your oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. You will read a range of classic texts including the ancient epic Gilgamesh, William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. You will study short but complex texts, including essays by Jonathan Swift and Mary Wollstonecraft, and influential speeches by Queen Elizabeth I and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Contemporary texts by Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott, and Chinua Achebe round out the course.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the writing process.
  • Learn Standard English conventions with a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Epic Beginnings
Unit 2: From the Middle Ages through the Renaissance
Unit 3: Life in the Renaissance
Unit 4: Elizabethan Drama: The Tragedy of Hamlet
Unit 5: The Enlightenment in England
Unit 6: Romanticism in England
Unit 7: The Gothic Novel: The Strange
Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Unit 8: Nineteenth-Century England
Unit 9: The First Half of the Twentieth Century
Unit 10: Cultural Reflections in Art and Artifacts
Unit 11: Contemporary Voices
Unit 12: Success and Planning for the Future

IDEA Writing

Course Description

Motivating students in grades 9–12 to become more articulate and effective writers, this one-semester course offers hands-on experience writing personal reflections, definition essays, research essays, persuasive essays, informative essays, and literary analysis essays. Offering targeted lessons on reputable research, effective communication, solid grammar, and compelling style, this one-semester course utilizes the Six Traits of Effective Writing as an overarching framework. Students enrolled in this course develop the skills necessary to evaluate their own writing and articulate and apply writing and researching strategies. In addition, students will get further practice applying the grammatical rules of Standard American English in formal writing.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Practice academic writing, including research, presenting evidence, and developing voice and style
  • Examine the Six Trait Writing Steps and apply them to writing development
  • Practice writing persuasive, informative, and literary analysis essays
  • Develop writing skills, from the choosing the right word, to shaping sentences, paragraphs, and the entire essay
  • Apply advanced grammar rules and techniques

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Introduction to Writing
Unit 2: Pre-Writing
Unit 3: Revising and Editing
Unit 4: Sentence Structure
Unit 5: Grammar
Unit 6: Research, Synthesize, Cite, and Gather Information
Unit 7: Meaning
Unit 8: Design
Unit 9: Clarity
Unit 10: Voice

Introduction to Communications & Speech

Course Description

Beginning with an introduction that builds student understanding of the elements, principles, and characteristics of human communication, this course offers fascinating insight into verbal and nonverbal messages and cultural and gender differences in the areas of listening and responding. High school students enrolled in this one-semester course will be guided through engaging lectures and interactive activities, exploring themes of self-awareness and perception in communication. The course concludes with units on informative and persuasive speeches, and students are given the opportunity to critique and analyze speeches in the course.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand verbal and nonverbal aspects of human communication
  • Evaluate factors that impact the quality of communication, including interpersonal relationships, gender, and culture
  • Analyze communication on multiple levels, including interpersonal, small group, and organizational
  • Prepare and deliver effective presentations and speeches for a variety of purposes

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Communications: Foundations of Communication
Unit 2: Communications: Understanding Verbal and Nonverbal Messages
Unit 3: Communications: Listening and Responding; Culture and Gender Differences
Unit 4: Communications: Interpersonal, Small Group, and Organizational Communication
Unit 5: Speech: Introduction to Public Speaking
Unit 6: Speech: Preparing and Delivering Your Speech
Unit 7: Speech: Informative and Persuasive Presentations

English Language Arts 9 Honors

Course Description

This freshman honors English course invites students to explore a variety of diverse and complex texts organized into thematic units. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing.

In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and to participate in project-based learning activities, including writing a Shakespearian sonnet and creating an original interpretation of a Shakespearian play. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Jack London’s “To Build a Fire” and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” Students will also read Sue Macy’s full length nonfiction work Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way), and will study a variety of short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the routine and process of writing.
  • Learn to use Standard English from a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Mythology
Unit 2: The Epic Hero’s Quest
Unit 3: Individuality and Conformity
Unit 4: Independence and the Bicycle
Unit 5: Nature and the Environment
Unit 6: Making a Difference
Unit 7: Caring
Unit 8: Tragedy and Drama
Unit 9: Espionage and Intrigue
Unit 10: Mystery and Suspense
Unit 11: Fighting for Equality
Unit 12: Unity and Division

English Language Arts 11

Course Description

This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students will master the comprehension and literary analysis strategies that the Common Core State Standards require. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of American literature
  • Analyze seminal works of American literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the six traits of writing
  • Learn to use Standard English through a variety of grammar lessons

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: American Roots: From Native Traditions to the American Revolution
Unit 2: Bright Romanticism: American Individualism
Unit 3: Dark Romanticism: American Gothic
Unit 4: A Nation Divided and Expanding: Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism
Unit 5: Realist Novel Study: The Awakening by Kate Chopin
Unit 6: “Make It New”: Early Modernism
Unit 7: Modern Drama Study: Trifles by Susan Glaspell
Unit 8: Victory and Despair: The Roaring Twenties, Modernism, and Postwar Outlooks
Unit 9: “I, too, Am America”: The Harlem Renaissance and The Civil Rights Movement
Unit 10: Cultural Rebellion: Mid Twentieth-Century Voices
Unit 11: Heritage and Multicultural American Identities: Contemporary Voices
Unit 12: Globalization and the Information Age: Postmodernism into the Twenty-First Century

English Language Arts 12 Honors

Course Description

This senior-year honors English course invites students to delve into British literature, from ancient texts such as the epic of Beowulf through contemporary works. Students will engage in a variety of rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry, literary analysis, and inferential evaluation. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres, and synthesize ideas across multiple texts. In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and participate in project-based learning activities, including creating a time travel brochure and an original interpretation of William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell, and William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet. In addition to full length works, students will read a variety of excerpts, including readings from Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Smithsonian’s History of America in 101 Objects, and Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, as well as a variety of short fiction, speeches, and poetry.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the writing process.
  • Learn Standard English conventions with a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Epic Beginnings
Unit 2: From the Middle Ages through the Renaissance
Unit 3: Life in the Renaissance
Unit 4: Elizabethan Drama: The Tragedy of Hamlet
Unit 5: The Enlightenment in England
Unit 6: Romanticism in England
Unit 7: The Gothic Novel: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Unit 8: Nineteenth-Century England
Unit 9: The First Half of the Twentieth Century
Unit 10: Cultural Reflections in Art and Artifacts
Unit 11: Contemporary Voices
Unit 12: Success and Planning for the Future

Literacy and Comprehension I

Course Description

Literacy and Comprehension I is one of two semester-long intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Read a variety of texts from discrete fields and apply strategies to readings
  • Learn and practice the writing process from idea development to revision
  • Apply language skills across all areas and fields
  • Strengthen vocabulary skills to help contextualize meaning
  • Develop analytical media literacy skills applicable to various genres

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Literacy and Comprehension: An Introduction
Unit 2: The Environment: Extreme Weather
Unit 3: The Animals: Amazing
Unit 4: The Arts: World Artists Discovered
Unit 5: Technology: The World of Gaming
Unit 6: The Medical Field: Mystery Illnesses Through the Ages
Unit 7: The Stories We Spin: Ancient and Modern Myths Uncovered
Unit 8: Engineering Today: The Challenge – Transportation

English Language Arts 10

Course Description

This sophomore-year English course invites students to explore a diverse selection of world literature organized into thematic units. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students learn essential reading comprehension strategies and engage in literary analysis and evaluation of both classic and contemporary works. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their listening and speaking skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Throughout the course, students read a range of classic and contemporary literary texts including Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. In addition to reading a wide range of literary texts, students read and analyze complex informational and argumentative texts including Sonia Sotomayor’s “A Latina Judge’s Voice,” Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, and the contemporary informational text Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational and contemporary works of literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the routine and process of writing.
  • Learn to use Standard English from a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are listed below:

Unit 1: Stories from around the World
Unit 2: Life-Changing Journeys
Unit 3: Sugar Changed the World
Unit 4: The Power of Humor
Unit 5: Animal Farm
Unit 6: The Human Experience
Unit 7: Striving for Equality
Unit 8: The Language of Leaders
Unit 9: The Tragedy of Julius Cesar
Unit 10: Globalization and the Future

English Language Arts 11 Honors

Course Description

This junior-year honors English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, including the full length novel The Awakening by Kate Chopin.

While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. To round out the course, students will read a range of short but complex texts, including Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Civil Disobedience,” Floyd Dell’s drama King Arthur’s Socks, and works by Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of foundational works of American literature.
  • Analyze seminal works of American literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning.
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
  • Demonstrate increasing sophistication in the routine and process writing.
  • Learn to use Standard English from a variety of grammar lessons.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: American Roots: From Native Traditions to the American Revolution
Unit 2: Bright Romanticism: American Individualism
Unit 3: Dark Romanticism: American Gothic
Unit 4: A Nation Divided and Expanding: Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism
Unit 5: Realist Novel Study: The Awakening by Kate Chopin
Unit 6: Make It New!: Early Modernism
Unit 7: Modern Drama Study
Unit 8: Victory and Despair: The Roaring Twenties, Modernism, and Postwar Outlooks
Unit 9: “I, too, Am America”: The Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights Movement
Unit 10: Cultural Rebellion: Mid Twentieth-Century Voices
Unit 11: Heritage and Multicultural American Identities: Contemporary Voices
Unit 12: Globalization and the Information Age: Postmodernism into the Twenty-First Century

Expository Reading and Writing

Course Description

This elective English course is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills while preparing high school students to meet the demands of college-level work. While students will explore some critical reading skills in fiction and poetry, the focus of this course will be on expository and persuasive texts and the analytical reading skills that are necessary for college success. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Walt Whitman, Cesar Chavez, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Amy Tan, Langston Hughes, Ayn Rand, Naomi Shihab Nye, Maya Angelou, and Gary Soto.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of essential reading process skills and strategies
  • Analyze works of literary nonfiction and evaluate their structure and reasoning
  • Analyze the impact of an author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text
  • Demonstrate an increased sophistication in crucial argumentative and expository writing skills
  • Learn to use Standard English through a variety of grammar and vocabulary lessons

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Freedom Fighters
Unit 2: Making Communities Safer
Unit 3: Struggling for Freedom and Equality
Unit 4: Making a Difference
Unit 5: Identity and Belonging
Unit 6: Visions of America
Unit 7: Research Workshop
Unit 8: Exploring the Information Age

Literacy and Comprehension II

Course Description

Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy and Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real world texts. Presented as two one-semester reading-intervention courses, both offer an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text  structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Read a variety of texts from discrete fields and apply strategies to readings
  • Learn and practice the writing process from idea development to revision
  • Apply language skills across all areas and fields
  • Strengthen vocabulary skills to help contextualize meaning
  • Develop analytical media literacy skills applicable to various genres

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Literacy and Comprehension: An Introduction
Unit 2: The Sky’s the Limit: Amazing Architecture
Unit 3: The Environment: What Does It Mean to Go Green?
Unit 4: The Arts: Designers, Directors, and Artists
Unit 5: The Extreme: Media and Sports
Unit 6: The Technology: Mysteries and Forensics
Unit 7: The World: Global Politics – The Impact
Unit 8: The Society We Live In: Practical Living

Mathematics

Pre-Algebra

Course Description

This full-year course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Perform operations with rational numbers and use them to simplify expressions
  • Use mathematical and algebraic expressions and equations to represent and solve a variety of mathematical and real-world problems
  • Understand the concept of a function and its use in representing relationships
  • Exercise proportional thinking and use it to analyze the connection between ratio, proportion, and percent
  • Understand geometric concepts and strengthen spatial reasoning
  • Develop and use problem-solving strategies
  • Use statistics to display, describe, and analyze data
  • Understand counting methods, and apply them to calculate probabilities

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Number Sense
Unit 2: Expressions
Unit 3: Equations and Inequalities
Unit 4: Ratios, Proportional Relationships, and Percents
Unit 5: Number Properties
Unit 6: Analytic Geometry
Unit 7: Geometry Basics
Unit 8: Counting and Probability
Unit 9: Statistics
Unit 10: Square Roots and Right Triangles
Unit 11: Two-Dimensional Geometry
Unit 12: Three-Dimensional Geometry

Algebra II

Course Description

This course focuses on the four critical areas of the Common Core model pathway for Algebra II: functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions, to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students will make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies between the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. The Common Core practice standards are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
  • Compare and connect the structure of the polynomial system and the system of integers
  • Use the coordinate plane to extend trigonometry to model periodic phenomena
  • Synthesize and generalize what you have learned about a variety of function families
  • Relate visual data displays and summary statistics to different types of data, including probability distributions

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Expressions and Equations
Unit 2: Introduction to Functions
Unit 3: Quadratics and Complex Numbers
Unit 4: Inequalities and Systems
Unit 5: Polynomial Operations
Unit 6: Polynomial Functions
Unit 7: Rational Functions
Unit 8: Radical Functions
Unit 9: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Unit 10: More with Relations and Functions
Unit 11: Statistics and Probability
Unit 12: Trigonometric Functions

Geometry Honors

Course Description

Based on plane Euclidean geometry, this rigorous full-year course addresses the critical areas of: congruence, proof, and constructions; similarity and trigonometry; circles; three-dimensional figures; and probability of compound events. Transformations and deductive reasoning are common threads throughout the course. Students build on their conceptual understanding of rigid transformations established in middle school as they formally define each and then, use them to prove theorems about lines, angles, and triangle congruency. Rigid transformations are also used to establish relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures. Students use their knowledge of proportional reasoning and dilations to develop a formal definition for similarity of figures. They apply their understanding of similarity to defining trigonometric ratios and radian measure. Algebraic connections are made as students use coordinate algebra to verify properties of figures in the coordinate plane and write equations of parabolas and circles. Throughout the course, students investigate properties of figures, make conjectures, and prove theorems. Students demonstrate their reasoning by completing proofs in a variety of formats. The Standards of mathematical practice are embedded throughout the course as students apply geometric concepts in modeling situations, make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Use transformations to understand and explain triangle congruence and similarity.
    Perform geometric constructions and justify them.
  • Formalize reasoning by writing proofs in a variety of formats.
  • Apply geometric concepts to model and solve real-world problems.
  • Visualize the relationship between two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures.
  • Apply probability concepts

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Foundations of Euclidean Geometry
Unit 2: Geometric Transformations
Unit 3: Angles and Lines
Unit 4: Triangles
Unit 5: Triangle Congruence
Unit 6: Similarity Transformations
Unit 7: Applications of Probability
Unit 8: Right Triangle Relationshios and
Trigonometry
Unit 9: Quadrilaterals and Coordinate Algebra
Unit 10: Circles
Unit 11: Describing Curves with Coordinates
Unit 12: Geometric Modeling in Two Dimensions
Unit 13: Geometric Modeling in Three Dimensions

Mathematics III

Course Description

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles, developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions
  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
  • Apply various functions learned to real world applications
  • Understand and apply the Laws of Sines and Cosines to problems
  • Solve and graph quadratic expressions and functions

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Inferences and Conclusions from Data
Unit 2: Polynomials, Rational, and Radical Relationships: Part One
Unit 3: Polynomials, Rational, and Radical Relationships: Part Two
Unit 4: Polynomials, Rational, and Radical Relationships: Part Three
Unit 5: Trigonometry of General Triangles and Trigonometric Functions
Unit 6: Mathematical Modeling: Part One
Unit 7: Mathematical Modeling: Part Two
Unit 8: Mathematical Modeling: Part Three
Unit 9: Mathematical Modeling: Part Four

Trigonometry

Course Description

In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the Laws of Sines and Cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. The course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s Theorem.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Define and apply the six trigonometric functions
  • Understand the connection between trigonometric and circular functions
  • Graph all six trigonometric functions and their transformations
  • Solve problems in oblique triangles using the Law of Sines, Cosines, and area formulas
  • Use the basic trigonometric identities to verify other trigonometric identities and to simplify
    complex trigonometry expressions
  • Solve trigonometric equations
  • Plot points and graph equations in the polar coordinate system
  • Use trigonometry concepts to solve real-world problems

Student Expectations

This course requires the same level of commitment from you as a traditional classroom course would. Throughout the course, you are expected to spend approximately 5–7 hours per week online on the following activities:

  • Interactive lessons that include a mixture of instructional videos and tasks
  • Assignments in which you apply and extend learning in each lesson
  • Assessments, including quizzes, tests, and cumulative exams

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Right Triangle Relationships
Unit 2: Applying Trigonometric Functions
Unit 3: Trigonometric Angles
Unit 4: Circular Trigonometry
Unit 5: Trigonometric Graphs
Unit 6: Translations of Trigonometric Graphs
Unit 7: Law of Sines
Unit 8: Trigonometric Identities
Unit 9: Trigonometric Identity Application
Unit 10: Polar Coordinate System

Concepts in Probability and Statistics

Course Description

This high-school course provides an alternative math credit for students who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra I and Pre-Calculus. It begins with an in-depth study of probability, with a focus on conceptual understanding. Students then move into an exploration of sampling and comparing populations. The first semester closes with units on data distributions and data analysis—including how to summarize data sets with a variety of statistics. In the second half of the course, students create and analyze scatterplots and begin a basic study of regression. Then they study two-way tables and normal distributions, learning about powerful applications such as hypothesis testing. Finally, students return to probability at a more advanced level, focusing on topics such as conditional probability, combinations and permutations, and sets.
The initial credit of the course includes four performance tasks, which must be graded by a teacher.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand probability concepts, including the difference between theoretical probability and
    experimental outcomes
  • Express the likelihood of single and multiple events numerically
  • Understand sampling procedures, and make inferences about populations from appropriate samples
  • Compute and interpret descriptive statistics about samples, including measures of center
    and measures of variability
  • Represent data graphically in meaningful ways, including dot plots, histograms, and box
    plots
  • Represent and interpret the relationship between two variables using scatterplots and
    regression
  • Apply an understanding of normally distributed data to make and test hypotheses
  • Apply probability concepts to a variety of situations

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Understanding Probability
Unit 2: Probability
Unit 3: Sampling and Comparing Populations
Unit 4: Data Distributions
Unit 5: Data Analysis
Unit 6: Constructing Scatterplots
Unit 7: Analyzing Scatterplots
Unit 8: Two-Way Tables and Statistics
Unit 9: Applications of Probability

Algebra I

Course Description

This full-year honors course introduces students to linear, exponential, and quadratic functions by interpreting, analyzing, comparing, and contrasting functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Technology is utilized within some lessons to further support students in identifying key features as well as displaying images of the functions. The course builds upon the basic concepts of functions to include transformations of linear and nonlinear functions. Students deepen their understanding of quantitative reasoning, piecewise functions, and quadratic functions through performance tasks. The additional performance-based skills allow the honors students to apply more of the concepts taught in the course. The course concludes with students analyzing data through displays and statistical analysis.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Apply quantitative reasoning in order to express relationships between quantities
    numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically, understanding the limitations of each representation.
  • Compare the key features of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions, and use these functions to model and solve problems.
  • Use function notation as a way to describe a dependent relationship.
  • Write and solve a variety of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and systems of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and interpret the solutions in context.
  • Analyze visual data displays and summary statistics to draw conclusions about different
    types of data.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Representing Relationships
Unit 2: Functions
Unit 3: Linear Functions
Unit 4: Linear Equations and Inequalities
Unit 5: Systems of Equations and Inequalities
Unit 6: Nonlinear Functions
Unit 7: Exponential Functions
Unit 8: Polynomial Expressions
Unit 9: Quadratic Functions
Unit 10: Quadratic Equations
Unit 11: Trends in Data
Unit 12: Data Analysis

Algebra II Honors

Course Description

The course begins with a review of concepts that will assist students throughout the course, such as literal equations, problem solving, and word problems. Students then progress to a unit on functions where students compute operations of functions, compose of functions, and study inverses of functions. To build on their algebraic skills, students learn about complex numbers and apply them to quadratic functions via the completing the square and quadratic formula methods. Next, students solve linear systems and apply their knowledge of the concept to three-by-three systems. An in-depth study on polynomial operations and functions allow students build their knowledge of polynomials algebraically and graphically. In the second semester, students study nonlinear functions. Students solve and graph rational and radical functions whereas the exponential and logarithmic functions focus on the key features and transformations of the functions. Expected value and normal distribution concepts expand students’ knowledge of probability and statistics. Students also cover trigonometric functions and periodic phenomena.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations.
  • Compare and connect the structure of the polynomial system and the system of integers.
  • Use the coordinate plane to extend trigonometry to model periodic phenomena.
  • Synthesize and generalize what you have learned about a variety of function families.
  • Relate visual data displays and summary statistics to different types of data, including
    probability distributions.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Expressions and Equations
Unit 2: Introduction to Functions
Unit 3: Quadratics and Complex Numbers
Unit 4: Systems
Unit 5: Polynomial Operations
Unit 6: Polynomial Functions
Unit 7: Rational Functions
Unit 8: Radical Functions
Unit 9: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Unit 10: Statistics and Probability
Unit 11: Trigonometric Functions
Unit 12: Mathematical Modeling

Mathematics I

Course Description

This course formalizes and extends middle-school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend his reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and congruency theorems. Equations and figures in the coordinate plane assist in connecting Algebra and Geometry through coordinates. The structure and content of this course naturally guides students to experience mathematics as a rational, beneficial subject which challenges students to critically think through problem situations.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Analyze and interpret the structure of expressions and write expressions in
    equivalent forms to solve problems
  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
  • Recognize the graph of given data as being linear or exponential
  • Solve equations and inequalities in one variable and represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically
  • Create and solve equations that describe numbers or relationships
  • Model and solve problems with linear systems graphically

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Relationships Between Quantities
Unit 2: Linear and Exponential Relationships: Part One
Unit 3: Linear and Exponential Relationships: Part Two
Unit 4: Linear and Exponential Relationships: Part Three
Unit 5: Reasoning with Equations: Part One
Unit 6: Reasoning with Equations: Part Two
Unit 7: Descriptive Statistics
Unit 8: Congruence, Proof, and Constructions: Part One
Unit 9: Congruence, Proof, and Constructions: Part Two
Unit 10: Connecting Algebra and Geometry Through Coordinates

Precalculus

Course Description

With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Analyze and interpret the structure of polynomial, rational, and exponential functions
  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
  • Explore mathematical reasoning used in trigonometric functions
  • Demonstrate and understanding of matrices and solve systems using matrix equations
  • Explore and calculate theoretical probabilities and develop a probability distribution for a random variable
  • Classify conic equations and construct graphs of conic sections

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Equations and Inequalities
Unit 2: Functions
Unit 3: Conics
Unit 4: Trigonometric Functions
Unit 5: Trigonometry of General Triangles
Unit 6: Matrices
Unit 7: Vectors
Unit 8: Probability

Mathematical Models with Applications

Course Description

Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment loan models. Providing timely and highly useful content, this two-semester course is a must-have for any high school student. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Model real world situations using the various forms of linear and quadratic functions
    Graph trigonometric functions and identify their properties
  • Use exponential functions to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems such as
    population growth and compound interest
    Understand the fundamentals of personal finance and financial planning
  • Apply counting methods to calculate binomial probabilities
  • Interpret and represent data in various formats, and use it to model and make predictions
  • Translate between the properties of geometric shapes in the plane to three-dimensional figures

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Problem-Solving Models
Unit 2: Graphical and Statistical Models
Unit 3: Function Models
Unit 4: Financial Models
Unit 5: Exponential, Trigonometric, and Variation Models
Unit 6: Geometric Models

Algebra I Honors

Course Description

This full-year honors course introduces students to linear, exponential, and quadratic functions by interpreting, analyzing, comparing, and contrasting functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Technology is utilized within some lessons to further support students in identifying key features as well as displaying images of the functions. The course builds upon the basic concepts of functions to include transformations of linear and nonlinear functions. Students deepen their understanding of quantitative reasoning, piecewise functions, and quadratic functions through performance tasks. The additional performance-based skills allow the honors students to apply more of the concepts taught in the course. The course concludes with students analyzing data through displays and statistical analysis.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Apply quantitative reasoning in order to express relationships between quantities
    numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically, understanding the limitations of each representation.
  • Compare the key features of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions, and use these functions to model and solve problems.
  • Use function notation as a way to describe a dependent relationship.
  • Write and solve a variety of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and systems of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and interpret the solutions in context.
  • Analyze visual data displays and summary statistics to draw conclusions about different
    types of data.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Representing Relationships
Unit 2: Functions
Unit 3: Linear Functions
Unit 4: Linear Equations and Inequalities
Unit 5: Systems of Equations and Inequalities
Unit 6: Nonlinear Functions
Unit 7: Exponential Functions
Unit 8: Polynomial Expressions
Unit 9: Quadratic Functions
Unit 10: Quadratic Equations
Unit 11: Trends in Data
Unit 12: Data Analysis

Geometry

Course Description

Based on plane Euclidean geometry, this rigorous full-year course addresses the critical areas of: congruence, proof, and constructions; similarity and trigonometry; circles; three-dimensional figures; and probability of compound events. Transformations and deductive reasoning are common threads throughout the course. Students build on their conceptual understanding of rigid transformations established in middle school as they formally define each and then, use them to prove theorems about lines, angles, and triangle congruency. Rigid transformations are also used to establish relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures. Students use their knowledge of proportional reasoning and dilations to develop a formal definition for similarity of figures. They apply their understanding of similarity to defining trigonometric ratios and radian measure. Students also make algebraic connections as they use coordinate algebra to verify properties of figures in the coordinate plane and write equations of parabolas and circles. Throughout the course, students investigate properties of figures, make conjectures, and prove theorems. Students demonstrate their reasoning by completing proofs in a variety of formats. The standards of mathematical practice are embedded throughout the course as students apply geometric concepts in modeling situations, make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Use transformations to understand and explain triangle congruence and similarity.
  • Perform geometric constructions and justify them.
  • Formalize reasoning by writing proofs in a variety of formats.
  • Apply geometric concepts to model and solve real-world problems.
  • Visualize the relationship between two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures.
  • Apply probability concepts

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:

Unit 1: Foundations of Euclidean Geometry
Unit 2: Geometric Transformations
Unit 3: Angles and Lines
Unit 4: Triangles
Unit 5: Triangle Congruence
Unit 6: Similarity Transformations
Unit 7: Right Triangle Relationships and Trigonometry
Unit 8: Quadrilaterals and Coordinate Algebra
Unit 9: Circles
Unit 10: Geometric Modeling in Two Dimensions
Unit 11: Geometric Modeling in Three Dimensions
Unit 12: Applications of Probability

Mathematics II

Course Description

This course begins by focusing on the extension of the number system. Students evaluate functions, touch on exponential functions, and explore the operations of polynomials. Next, nonlinear functions are covered before students complete a unit on factoring polynomials using various methods. The course continues with quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from previous courses. As quadratic equations become more multifaceted, real and complex numbers are introduced to extend the set of rational numbers which can be used to solve quadratic equations. Students also explore the link between probability and data through conditional probability, two-way tables, and counting methods. Finally, this course challenges students to make connections between algebra and geometry as they study similarity, right triangle trigonometry and proofs, as well as circles with and without coordinates. Students are able to use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically as well as analyze two- and three- dimensional figures. The content within this course allows students to practice problem solving and critical thinking as they attempt real-world scenario math problems.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of functions and use functions to describe quantitative relationships
  • Communicate effectively using graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
  • Students will solve geometric problems relating to triangles, circles, and solids
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between real and non-real numbers
  • Study the theory and application of probability.
  • Solve and graph quadratic expressions and functions

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Extending the Number System
Unit 2: Nonlinear Functions
Unit 3: Polynomial Expressions
Unit 4: Quadratic Functions and Modeling
Unit 5: Expressions and Equations: Part One
Unit 6: Expressions and Equations: Part Two
Unit 7: Applications of Probability
Unit 8: Similarity, Right Triangle Trigonometry, and Proof: Part One
Unit 9: Similarity, Right Triangle Trigonometry, and Proof: Part Two
Unit 10: Circles With and Without Coordinates
Unit 11: Two- and Three- Dimensional Figures

Pre-Calculus Honors

Course Description

This full-year advanced math course starts with a unit on the nature of functions and complex numbers before moving into matrices, systems, and linear programming. Students then return to functions with a focus on graphing a variety of function types; this unit includes a performance task on production schemes. Students explore rational functions in depth and then conclude the first semester with right triangle and circular trigonometry. In the second half of the course, students synthesize what they have learned to graph and solve trigonometric functions. They also study vectors, conics and analytic geometry, statistics and probability, mathematical modeling, and sequences and series.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Apply quantitative reasoning in order to express relationships between quantities
    numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically, understanding the limitations of each representation.
  • Compare the key features of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions, and use these functions to model and solve problems.
  • Use function notation as a way to describe a dependent relationship.
  • Write and solve a variety of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and systems of one- and two-variable equations and inequalities, and interpret the solutions in context.
  • Analyze visual data displays and summary statistics to draw conclusions about different
    types of data.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Nature of Functions and Complex Numbers
Unit 2: Matrices
Unit 3: Systems of Equations
Unit 4: Functions and Their Graphs
Unit 5: Rational Functions
Unit 6: Right Triangle and Circular Trigonometry
Unit 7: Graphing Trigonometric Functions
Unit 8: Trigonometry
Unit 9: Vectors
Unit 10: Conics and Analytic Geometry
Unit 11: Statistics and Probability
Unit 12: Mathematical Modeling
Unit 13: Sequences and Series

Financial Math

Course Description

Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Apply the basics of personal finance to real-world situations
  • Understand the rules and regulations of federal and state taxes
  • Use statistics to make data-based financial decisions
  • Understand economics from a global and small-business standpoint
  • Distinguish between various forms of debt and credit, and analyze each
  • Calculate return on various forms of investments

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Personal Financial Planning
Unit 2: Income
Unit 3: Budgeting and Wise Spending
Unit 4: Banking
Unit 5: Paying Taxes
Unit 6: The Importance of Insurance
Unit 7: Long-Term Investing
Unit 8: Buying a House
Unit 9: Consumer Loans
Unit 10: Consumer Credit
Unit 11: Consumer Debt
Unit 12: Economic Principles
Unit 13: Traveling Abroad
Unit 14: Starting a Business
Unit 15: Analyzing Business Data

Social Studies and History

Survey of U.S. History

Course Description

This course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization as they assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the modern two-party system.
  • Explore the evolution of American culture and society, including the role of reform movements, from the colonial era to the present.
  • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts
    throughout U.S. history.
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy to the leading economic force in the world.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Thirteen Colonies
Unit 2: The American Revolution
Unit 3: A New Nation
Unit 4: Westward Expansion and Sectionalism
Unit 5: The Civil War and Reconstruction
Unit 6: Industrialization and the Gilded Age
Unit 7: Progressivism and Reform
Unit 8: Imperialism and the Great War
Unit 9: World War II
Unit 10: The Rise of the Cold War
Unit 11: Civil Rights
Unit 12: America in the Modern World

Survey of World History Honors

Course Description

From the first civilizations through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our world’s history. Students investigate classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia while exploring the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. Units progress through the course by touching on world wars, imperialism, and cultural aspects of each region’s society. From creating an explorer’s notebook to mapping out how Europe changed after World War II, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the region and era of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels such as Charles Dickens’ Hard Times and excerpts from memoirs like that of Ji-li Jiang’s, titled Red Scarf Girl. Projects such as writing a summary of a current event based on an ancient religion encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate the development of civilization in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, and
    explore how societies change over time.
  • Analyze technological, political, social, and economic revolutions in world history.
  • Explore the conflicts between nations to present day, and analyze the challenges facing the modern world.
  • Describe cultural characteristics of societies over time, including the role of women, religion, and art and literature, and investigate the effects of technological innovation on economic and social change.
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Early Civilization
Unit 2: Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome
Unit 3: Eastern Culture and Civilization
Unit 4: Medieval Europe
Unit 5: Transition to Modern Times
Unit 6: Exploration, Colonization, and Conquest
Unit 7: Absolutism and the Rising Tide of Revolution
Unit 8: Nationalism and Industrialism
Unit 9: Imperialism and World War I
Unit 10: The Interwar Years and World War II
Unit 11: Communism and the Cold War
Unit 12: Decolonization and Independence
Unit 13: Modern Issues in a Global Society

U.S. History I Honors

Course Description

From the first colonial settlements through the Gilded Age and industrialization, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of the beginnings of our nation’s history. Students investigate the political, social, cultural, intellectual, and technological revolutions of the United States that have helped to lay the foundation of our country. Units progress through the course by starting with an in-depth look at the first settlements and European explorations that eventually led to colonization.
Students study the events and outcomes of the American Revolution, as well as the creation of the Constitution and the beginnings of our government. Manifest destiny and slavery are the next topics students analyze that lead into a closer look at the Civil War and how it changed our nation. From writing about the Lincoln-Douglas debates to analyzing the effects of immigration and urbanization, students are better equipped to understand what happened during our nation’s beginnings.

Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read selections like “Your People Live Only Upon Cod,” and poetry such as “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Activities such as writing a personal narrative as either a slave or newly freed person and analyzing a report on child labor encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Describe the geographical regions of the United States and the influence of these regions on early settlements and the nation’s development.
  • Explore different cultures within U.S. history and how these cultures were changed by various influences, such as settlement, acts of government, and conflicts.
  • Examine the importance of cultural and reform movements on U.S. government and society.
  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic
    ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the two-party system.
    Investigate and understand the reasons behind
  • American involvement in wars and conflicts
    throughout U.S. history.
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an
    industrial economy.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The New World
Unit 2: The Thirteen Colonies
Unit 3: Road to Revolution
Unit 4: War of Independence
Unit 5: A New Nation
Unit 6: Jacksonian Democracy
Unit 7: Manifest Destiny
Unit 8: Sectionalism
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Unit 9: Rising Tensions
Unit 10: The Civil War
Unit 11: Reconstruction
Unit 12: Industrialization and the West

Economics

Course Description

This semester-long course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate fundamental economic principles, and explore their impact on economic choices.
  • Examine the effects of economic regulations and limitations established by governments.
  • Discover how your economic choices are tied to the global economy.
  • Apply economic concepts and theories to everyday financial decisions.
  • Read complex texts at grade level.
  • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from sources you have
    gathered.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Introduction to Economics
Unit 2: Microeconomics
Unit 3: Macroeconomics
Unit 4: Business and Government
Unit 5: The Global Economy
Unit 6: Financial Literacy

U.S. Government Honors

Course Description

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce
influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process. The course culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy approaches. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing a full informative essay.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate the founding principles that guided the establishment of the US government.
  • Analyze the civil rights and liberties that are granted to US citizens, and understand the
    influence of constitutional amendments and Supreme Court decisions that have developed
    these rights.
  • Understand the structures and procedures of local, state, and federal governments.
  • Discover how you can participate in government by voting, running for office, meeting civic obligations, and petitioning your representatives.
  • Read complex texts at grade level.
  • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from sources you have
    gathered.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Introduction to American Government
Unit 2: The Constitution
Unit 3: Civil Rights and Liberties
Unit 4: Government Institutions
Unit 5: Civics and Participation
Unit 6: Public Policy

Survey of U.S. History Honors

Course Description

From the first colonial settlements through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our nation’s history. Students investigate the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed our country into the nation it is today. Units progress through the course by taking an in-depth look at events such as those surrounding the creation of the Constitution, the Civil War, our nation’s involvement in World War I and II, as well as cultural aspects of our society. From writing about life in the colonies to analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels like Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, and poetry such as “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Activities such as writing a petition and analyzing various Presidents’ speeches encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the modern two-party system.
  • Explore the evolution of American culture and society, including the role of reform movements, from the colonial era to the present.
  • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts throughout U.S. history.
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy to the leading economic force in the world.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Thirteen Colonies
Unit 2: The American Revolution
Unit 3: A New Nation
Unit 4: Westward Expansion and Sectionalism
Unit 5: The Civil War and Reconstruction
Unit 6: Industrialization and the Gilded Age
Unit 7: Progressivism and Reform
Unit 8: Imperialism and the Great War
Unit 9: World War II
Unit 10: The Rise of the Cold War
Unit 11: Civil Rights
Unit 12: The US in the Modern World

Modern World History

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: SS3316 IC
Grade level: 10
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

This year-long course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the
Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate civilizations in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas and explore how they have changed over time.
  • Analyze technological, political, social, and economic revolutions in world history.
  • Explore the conflicts between nations to present day, and analyze the challenges facing the modern world.
  • Describe cultural characteristics of societies over time, including the role of women, religion, and art and literature, and investigate the effects of technological innovation on economic and social change.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Enlightenment and Revolution
Unit 2: Nationalism and the Growth of Nation-States
Unit 3: Industrialization
Unit 4: The New Imperialism
Unit 5: World War I
Unit 6: Effects of World War I
Unit 7: Totalitarianism
Unit 8: World War II
Unit 9: The Post-War World
Unit 10: The Cold War
Unit 11: Nation Building in the Modern World
Unit 12: Challenges in the Modern World

U.S. History II

Course Description

U.S. History II is a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the modern two-party system
  • Explore the evolution of American culture and society, including the role of reform movements, from industrialization to the present
  • Describe the role of immigration and migration in the development of the United States, and identify common push and pull factors that have affected these trends in U.S. history
  • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts
    throughout U.S. history
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy to the leading economic force in the world

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Industrialization and the Gilded Age
Unit 2: Immigration and Urbanization
Unit 3: Populism and the American West
Unit 4: Progressivism and Reform
Unit 5: Imperialism and the Great War
Unit 6: The ‘20s and the Great Depression
Unit 7: World War II
Unit 8: The Rise of the Cold War
Unit 9: Civil Rights
Unit 10: Era of Cultural Change
Unit 11: The ‘70s and ‘80s
Unit 12: America in the Modern World

Economics Honors

Course Description

From creating graphs to reach equilibrium to learning to manage a bank account, students will take part in a more rigorous semester long study of the principles and processes of economics in the American system. Students begin with an introduction of basic economic concepts then move on to an in-depth study of microeconomic principles. Students showcase their understanding of supply, demand, and economic choices by completing a case study on starting a business. Students then turn to macroeconomic concepts, government policies, and entrepreneurship. With this foundation, students create a proposal for public policies and programs in a small developing nation. Students continue their study of Economics by examining global economic concepts such as trade barriers and agreements. This Honors course concludes with a unit on personal finance. Students will learn more about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit, and money management. Students extend their knowledge of personal financial planning by creating a successful budget. Throughout the course, economic theory is introduced, demonstrated, and reinforced through real-life scenarios and examples. In assignments and project-based lessons, students learn to apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate fundamental economic principles, and explore their impact on economic choices. Examine the effects of economic regulations and limitations established by governments.
  • Discover how your economic choices are tied to the global economy.
  • Apply economic concepts and theories to everyday financial decisions.
  • Read complex texts at grade level.
  • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from sources you have gathered.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below: Unit 1: Introduction to Economics Unit 2: Microeconomics Unit 3: Macroeconomics Unit 4: Business and Government Unit 5: The Global Economy Unit 6: Personal Finance

Human Geography

Course Description

Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this high school-level course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories.

Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems—from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution—this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Interpret maps and spatial data to analyze the organization of people and places
  • Identify factors that affect the delineation of regions and the role that natural and political
    boundaries play in the regionalization process
  • Analyze relationships and patterns that occur at different geographic scales
  • Examine the effect of changing political, economic, cultural, and physical systems on the
    relationships among places
  • Investigate ways the environment has influenced human inhabitance, and analyze the effect that human settlement and activity have had on the environment
  • Use social studies skills to access, interpret, and apply information from a variety of sources

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Introduction to Human and Physical Geography
Unit 2: Global Geography: The United States
and Canada, Latin America, and Europe
Unit 3: Global Geography: Africa and the Middle East
Unit 4: Global Geography: Asia, Oceania, Australia, and Antarctica
Unit 5: Human Geography: Population
Unit 6: Human Geography: Culture
Unit 7: Politics and Boundaries
Unit 8: Agriculture and Land Use
Unit 9: Industrialization and Economic Development
Unit 10: The Urban Environment, Land Use, and Economic Development

Survey of World History

Course Description

This year-long course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate the development of civilization in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas and explore how societies change over time.
  • Analyze technological, political, social, and economic revolutions in world history.
  • Explore the conflicts between nations to present day, and analyze the challenges facing the modern world.
  • Describe cultural characteristics of societies over time, including the role of women, religion, and art and literature, and investigate the effects of technological innovation on economic and social change
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources Student Expectations

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Early Peoples
Unit 2: Early Civilizations
Unit 3: Eastern Culture and Civilization (550–1650)
Unit 4: Medieval Europe (500–1450)
Unit 5: Transition to Modern Times (1200–1700)
Unit 6: Absolutism and the Rising Tide of Revolution (1500–1815)
Unit 7: Nationalism and Industrialization (1800–1905)
Unit 8: Imperialism and the Great War (1850–1920)
Unit 9: World War II (1914–1939)
Unit 10: The Cold War and Its Effects
Unit 11: Decolonization and Independence
Unit 12: Modern Issues in a Global Society

U.S. History I

Course Description

U.S. History I is a year-long course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that paved the way for the United States of today. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Describe the geographical regions of the United States and the influence of these regions on early settlements and the nation’s development.
  • Explore different cultures within U.S. history and how these cultures were changed by various influences, such as settlement, acts of government, and conflicts.
  • Examine the importance of cultural and reform movements on U.S. government and society.
  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the two-party system.
  • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts
    throughout U.S. history.
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The New World
Unit 2: The Thirteen Colonies
Unit 3: Road to Revolution
Unit 4: War of Independence
Unit 5: A New Nation
Unit 6: Jacksonian Democracy
Unit 7: Manifest Destiny
Unit 8: Sectionalism
Unit 9: Rising Tensions
Unit 10: The Civil War
Unit 11: Reconstruction
Unit 12: Industrialization and the West

U.S. History II Honors

Course Description

From the Industrial Revolution through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our country’s modern history. Students investigate the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed our country into the nation it is today. Units progress through the course by taking an in-depth look at events such as those surrounding our nation’s expansion westward, civil rights in various eras, our nation’s involvement in World War I and II, as well as cultural aspects of our society. From analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions to writing about advancements in technology, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects.

Students read excerpts from novels like Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, and Geronimo’s autobiography, Story of His Life. Activities such as writing about how the frontier is part of America’s history and national character and analyzing various Presidents’ speeches encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic
    ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the modern two-party system.
  • Explore the evolution of American culture and society, including the role of reform movements, from industrialization to the present.
  • Describe the role of immigration and migration in the development of the United States, and identify common push and pull factors that have affected these trends in U.S. history.
  • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts
    throughout U.S. history.
  • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an
    industrial economy to the leading economic force in the world.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Industrialization and the Gilded Age
Unit 2: Immigration and Urbanization
Unit 3: Populism and the American West
Unit 4: Progressivism and Reform
Unit 5: Imperialism, World War I, and the 1920s
Unit 6: The Great Depression and the New Deal
Unit 7: World War II
Unit 8: The Rise of the Cold War
Unit 9: Civil Rights
Unit 10: An Era of Cultural Change
Unit 11: Toward a New Millennium
Unit 12: The US in the Modern World

U.S. Government

Course Description

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After rigorous review of the Constitution and its Amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy approaches. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Investigate the founding principles that guided the establishment of the United States
    government.
  • Analyze the civil rights and liberties that are granted to United States citizens, and
    understand the influence of constitutional amendments and Supreme Court decisions that have developed these rights.
  • Understand the structures and procedures of local, state, and federal governments.
  • Discover how you can participate in government by voting, running for office, meeting civic obligations, and petitioning your representatives.
  • Read complex texts at grade level.
  • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • Engage in routine writing in response to texts, concepts, and scenarios.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from sources you have
    gathered.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Introduction to American Government
Unit 2: The Constitution
Unit 3: Civil Rights and Liberties
Unit 4: Government Institutions
Unit 5: Civics and Participation
Unit 6: Public Policy

Science

Physical Science

Course Description

This full-year course focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Examine the periodic table and determine the properties of an element.
  • Investigate the structures, types, and properties of matter.
  • Learn about chemical bonds and chemical reactions.
  • Explain the relationship between motion and forces.
  • Recognize the interdependence of work and energy.
  • Relate heat and temperature change on the macroscopic level to particle motion on
    the microscopic level.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of waves, including sound and light.
  • Analyze the connection between electricity and magnetism.

Scope and Sequence

The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Matter
Unit 2: Atoms, Elements, and the Periodic Table
Unit 3: Bonding
Unit 4: Chemical Reactions
Unit 5: Solutions and Other Mixtures
Unit 6: Motion and Forces
Unit 7: Work and Energy
Unit 8: Temperature and Heat
Unit 9: Waves and Sound
Unit 10: Light
Unit 11: Electricity and Magnetism

Chemistry

Course Description

This rigorous full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties,
changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and
includes 18 virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications.
The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and
properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of
matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical
applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand and apply the methods of chemistry: scientific thinking, measurements,
    and using mathematics as a tool for logically solving chemistry problems.
  • Describe the composition and properties of matter as well as the changes that matter
    undergoes.
  • Trace the development of the atomic theory.
    Examine the relationship between the elements on the periodic table.
  • Describe chemical reactions and interactions and their causes and effects in real-world applications.
  • Apply critical thinking, reasoning, and decision-making skills to solve mathematical
    and non-mathematical chemistry problems.
  • Appreciate how chemistry affects daily life and society.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Nature and Processes of Science
Unit 2: Matter, Atomic Structure, and the Periodic Table
Unit 3: Chemical Bonding and Molecules
Unit 4: Chemical Reactions and Stoichiometry
Unit 5: The Kinetic Molecular Theory and States of Matter
Unit 6: Water and Solutions
Unit 7: Thermodynamics
Unit 8: Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium
Unit 9: Acids and Bases
Unit 10: Oxidation-Reduction and Electrochemistry
Unit 11: Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
Unit 12: Nuclear Chemistry

Physics

Course Description

This full-year course focuses on traditional concepts in physics, and encourages exploration
of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific
principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of motion,
energy, electricity, magnetism, and the laws that govern the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physics, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Explain the relationship between forces and motion.
  • Recognize the interdependence of work and energy.
  • Relate heat and temperature change on the macroscopic level to particle motion on
    the microscopic level.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of waves, including sound and light.
  • Investigate the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Analyze the connection between electricity and magnetism.
  • Examine nuclear reactions and their applications.
  • Explore recent advancements in physics such as the dual nature of light and nanotechnology.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope
and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Motion
Unit 2: Forces
Unit 3: Gravity
Unit 4: Work and Energy
Unit 5: Thermodynamics
Unit 6: Waves and Sound
Unit 7: Light
Unit 8: Electricity
Unit 9: Magnetism
Unit 10: Nuclear Physics
Unit 11: Modern Physics

Environmental Science

Course Description

Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many different aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand the interrelationships in the natural world
  • Examine the natural cycles of energy flow and evaluate how human interaction affects these cycles
  • Model real-world phenomena and determine possible consequences of specific actions
  • Defend the best choices to protect the environment with changing trends in human demographics
  • Interpret evidence and communicate scientifically about environmental conditions and hazards

Scope and Sequence

When you log into the Virtual Classroom, you can view the entire course map, which provides a scope and sequence of all topics you will study. Clicking a lesson’s link in the course map leads to a page listing instructional activities, assignments, and learning objectives specific to that lesson. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Scientific Method
Unit 2: Ecology
Unit 3: The Biosphere
Unit 4: The Land
Unit 5: Forests and Soil
Unit 6: The Water
Unit 7: Energy and Resources
Unit 8: Societies and Policy

Biology

Course Description

This compelling two-semester course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a year-long course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand the relationships among living organisms
  • Describe the functions and processes that control cellular activities
  • Trace the discoveries and scientific thought that increase the application of new
    technology in the field of DNA and genetics
  • Examine the taxonomy that organizes all organisms
  • Recognize the structures and functions of systems of the human body
  • Relate the interdependence of ecosystems and propose solutions to issues impacting the environment

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope
and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Scientific Knowledge and Inquiry
Unit 2: The Building Blocks of Life
Unit 3: Cell Biology
Unit 4: Cell Processes
Unit 5: Molecular Genetics
Unit 6: Heredity
Unit 7: Scientific Communication
Unit 8: The Evolution of Life
Unit 9: Taxonomy
Unit 10: The Human Body I
Unit 11: The Human Body II
Unit 12: Ecology

NGSS Chemistry

Course Description

This rigorous full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications. There is also a wet lab component for each of these labs. The components of this course include the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Describe the composition, properties, and types of matter.
  • Summarize the evolution of the atomic theory and the structure of an atom.
  • Examine the relationships among the elements on the periodic table.
  • Describe chemical reactions and types of chemical bonds.
  • Explain the relationship between chemistry and thermodynamics.
  • Recognize the interdependence of organisms and organic chemistry.
  • Explore nuclear chemistry and its applications.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Atoms, Elements, and the Periodic Table
Unit 2: States and Changes of Matter
Unit 3: Chemical Bonding and Reactions
Unit 4: Stoichiometry and the Gas Laws
Unit 5: Reaction Rates and Equilibrium
Unit 6: Energy in Chemical Reactions
Unit 7: Mixtures, Solutions, Acids, and Bases
Unit 8: Acids and Bases
Unit 9: Nuclear and Organic Chemistry

NGSS Physics

Course Description

This full-year course focuses on traditional concepts in physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of motion, energy, electricity, magnetism, and the laws that govern the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physics, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Explain the relationship between forces and motion.
  • Recognize the interdependence of work and energy.
  • Relate heat and temperature change on the macroscopic level to particle motion on
    the microscopic level.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of waves, including sound and light.
  • Investigate the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Analyze the connection between electricity and magnetism.
  • Examine nuclear reactions and their applications.
  • Explore recent advancements in physics such as the dual nature of light and nanotechnology.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope
and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: One-Dimensional Motion, Forces, and Momentum
Unit 2: Two-Dimensional Motion
Unit 3: Work and Energy
Unit 4: Thermodynamics
Unit 5: Harmonic Motion and Sound Waves
Unit 6: Electromagnetic Waves and Light
Unit 7: Electricity and Magnetism
Unit 8: Nuclear Physics
Unit 9: Modern Physics

NGSS Biology

Course Description

This year-long high school course engages students in the study of life and living organisms, and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. The course encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, which were developed by states to improve science education for all students. The goals of these standards are to develop a thorough understanding of content as well as improve key skills like communication, collaboration, inquiry, problem solving, and creative thinking.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Identify the characteristics of life and levels of organization within an organism.
  • Understand the differences between living and nonliving things as well as abiotic and biotic
    factors and their role in the environment.
  • Identify parts of a cell and describe the functions and processes that control cellular activities.
  • Explore the laws of inheritance and predict patterns in heredity.
  • Understand how genetic and environmental factors influence natural selection.
  • Examine the taxonomy that organizes all organisms.
  • Recognize the structures and functions of systems of the human body.
  • Describe the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem and propose solutions to issues impacting the environment.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below.
Unit 1: The Building Blocks of Life
Unit 2: Cell Biology
Unit 3: Cellular Processes
Unit 4: Molecular Genetics
Unit 5: Heredity
Unit 6: Evolution of Life
Unit 7: Taxonomy
Unit 8: The Human Body
Unit 9: Ecology

Chemistry Honors

Course Description

This rigorous two-semester course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes mathematical problem solving and practical applications of chemistry. Topics are examined in greater detail than general chemistry in order to prepare students for college-level coursework. Course components include atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, states and changes of matter, chemical and redox reactions, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Describe the composition, properties, and types of matter.
  • Summarize the evolution of the atomic theory and the structure of an atom.
  • Examine the relationships among the elements on the periodic table.
  • Describe chemical reactions and types of chemical bonds.
  • Explain the relationship between chemistry and thermodynamics.
  • Recognize the interdependence of organisms and organic chemistry.
  • Explore nuclear chemistry and its applications.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope
and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Scientific Inquiry: The Scientific Process
Unit 2: Scientific Inquiry: Analyzing and Communicating Scientific Information
Unit 3: Structure of Atoms
Unit 4: Structure and Properties of Matter: Chemical Bonding
Unit 5: Structure and Properties of Matter: States and Changes of Matter
Unit 6: Structure and Properties of Matter: Organic Chemistry and Compounds
Unit 7: Chemical Reactions: Types of Reactions
Unit 8: Chemical Reactions: Stoichiometry
Unit 9: Chemical Reactions: OxidationReduction Reactions
Unit 10: Chemical Reactions: Understanding Solutions
Unit 11: Chemical Reactions: Acids and Bases
Unit 12: Interactions of Energy and Matter: Reaction Rates and Equilibrium
Unit 13: Interactions of Energy and Matter: Energy in Chemical Reactions
Unit 14: Interactions of Energy and Matter: Nuclear Chemistry

Physics Honors

Course Description

This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes abstract reasoning and applications of physics concepts to real-world scenarios.
Topics are examined in greater detail than general physics and provide a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include one- and two-dimensional motion, momentum, energy and thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Explain the relationship between forces and motion.
  • Recognize the interdependence of work and energy.
  • Relate heat and temperature change on the macroscopic level to particle motion on
    the microscopic level.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of waves, including sound and light.
  • Investigate the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Analyze the connection between electricity and magnetism.
  • Examine nuclear reactions and their applications.
  • Explore recent advancements in physics such as the dual nature of light and
    nanotechnology.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope
and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Scientific Process
Unit 2: One-Dimensional Motion and Forces
Unit 3: Two-Dimensional Motion
Unit 4: Work and Energy
Unit 5: Thermodynamics
Unit 6: Waves and Sound
Unit 7: Waves and Light
Unit 8: Electricity and Magnetism
Unit 9: Nuclear and Modern Physics

Advanced Placement

AP English Language & Composition

Course Description

Students in AP English Language and Composition study how writers use language to create meaning. Students will read a variety of nonfiction prose and will analyze many styles and genres including essays, journalism, political writing, science writing, nature writing, autobiographies/biographies, diaries, speeches, history writing, and criticism. They focus the majority of their practice on writing expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Analysis is based on writers who are listed in the AP English Course Description. In addition to writing, students also study visual rhetoric such as photographs, advertisements, and political cartoons. As suggested in the AP English Course Description, students learn “to read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by the Modern Language Association.” The class is structured around teaching reading and writing skills honed by close reading of and writing original student essays, many of which are products of several revisions.

This content is presented in an online course through which students will view lectures from experienced highly qualified instructors, access nonfiction rhetoric (written and visual), and practice close reading and writing skills with continual feedback from instructors by means of various communication technologies, including phone, Instant Message, email, discussion thread, and live chat.

Materials Needed

Textbooks:
Author: Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, and Robin Dissin Aufses
Title: The Language of Composition Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin’s (2008)

Outside Texts:
Author: Frank McCourt
Title: Angela’s Ashes
Publisher: Metropolitan Books (2001)

Author: Barbara Ehrenrich
Title: Nickel and Dimed
Publisher: Metropolitan Books (2001)

Author: Jon Krakauer
Title: Into the Wild
Publisher: Anchor (1996)

Supplemental Websites: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com
Description: A compilation of resources, criticisms, suggestions and texts which are helpful in teaching APstudents.

Course Outline

Unit 1 – Introduction to RhetoricTopics:

  • What is Rhetoric?
  • Close Reading Skills
  • Argument Appeals and Visual Analysis
  • Analyzing Narrative Writing
  • The Exam: Writing the Analysis Essay
  • The Exam: Close Reading and Preparing for Multiple Choice

 

AP® French Language and Culture

Our Mission

To offer access and opportunity for all students to gain culturally-authentic world language reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills that students will need to become college and career-ready in a 21st Century global marketplace.

Course Description

Our online AP French Language course is an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP French Language course prepares them for the AP French exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century.

The course is designed as an immersion experience requiring the use of French exclusively.The online learning coach only uses French to communicate with students. In addition, all the reading, listening, speaking and writing is in French.

  1. The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board, namely, Global challenges
  2. Science and technology
  3. Contemporary life
  4. Personal and public identities
  5. Families and communities
  6. Beauty and aesthetics

The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.The course contains a forum where students share their own opinions and comments and comment on other students’ posts. The course makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.

Course Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:Listen, read, understand, and interpret a wide-variety of authentic French-language materials and sources.Demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using French.Gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world.Use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide variety of contexts.Develop insight into the nature of the French language and its culture.Use French to participate in communities at home and around the world.

Prerequisites

The AP French course is a college level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of materials can be compared to a third-year college course.

 

AP Spanish

Course Description

Our online AP Spanish Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course prepares students for the College Board’s AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century.

The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish.

The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board, namely,
1. Global challenges
2. Science and technology
3. Contemporary life
4. Personal and public identities
5. Families and communities
6. Beauty and aesthetics

The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their own opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students’ posts.

The course also makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.

Course Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Listen, read, understand, and interpret a wide-variety of authentic Spanish-language materials and sources.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using Spanish.
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Use Spanish to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide variety of contexts.
  • Develop insight into the nature of the Spanish language and its culture.
  • Use Spanish to participate in communities at home and around the world.

Prerequisites

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a college level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of materials can be compared to that of a third-year college course. Before taking this course, students should have the Spanish proficiency equal to this level and be prepared to dedicate sufficient time and effort required by this course.

 

AP English Literature & Composition

Course Description

Literature and Composition is designed to be a college/university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author or genre’s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository,
analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. In addition to exposing students to college-level English coursework, this course prepares them for the AP exam.

As the Student

What are students going to do in this course? This is a legitimate question. In fact, there are several essential questions that will guide students’ discovery and inquiry of literature throughout the course.

  • How does literature simultaneously provide a vicarious experience while helping to understand one self?
  • How does literature express universal themes
  • How does a close reading of literature serve as an avenue to enjoying and appreciating literature? These questions may seem lofty and idealistic, but students will be surprised to see the ways in which they connect to their everyday activities. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to approach a piece of literature (prose, poem, play, etc.)—moving beyond initial and purely emotional reactions—and respond to it critically both orally and in writing. Instead of merely identifying literary and stylistic devices, students will use them to illuminate their insights.

    These ideas help to form the foundation of the course’s goals:

  • To read carefully and analyze imaginative literature
  • To identify the style of a selection and make connections between meaning and form
  • To examine a variety of works from different genres and periods
  • To learn and understand a selected work very well
  • To write, focusing on critical analysis of literature including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays as well as creative writing, to sharpen understanding a text’s accomplishments and to deepen appreciation of literary artistry

 

AP U.S. History

Course Description

This year-long AP U.S. History course provides an in-depth study of American history from the pre-Colombian era to the present and is aligned to the new 2015 AP U.S. History exam. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students learn to assess historical materials, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship, and analyze and express historical understanding in writing.

Course Resources

Course Textbook

Henretta, James.
America’s History, Eighth Edition,
Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2014.

Primary Source Readers

Sheets, Kevin.
Sources for America’s History Volume I. Eighth Edition
Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2014.

Sheets, Kevin.
Sources for America’s History Volume II. Eighth Edition
Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2014.

Other Selections

Selections from these texts are included in the online course materials. Students do not need copies of these texts.

Madaras, Larry and SoRelle, James M. T
aking Sides: Clashing Views in United States History Volume I
New York: McGraw Hill, 2013.

Madaras, Larry and SoRelle, James M.
Taking Sides: Clashing Views in United States History Volume II
New York: McGraw Hill, 2013.

AP Human Geography

Course Introduction

AP® Human Geography is a yearlong college-level course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography Exam. The course focuses on the study of human populations and their interaction with one another, as well as with the physical and built environments.

Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, free-response writing, and research. Students will demonstrate that they can understand and implement skills via written work, project-based activities, and assessments.

Course Materials

Students will need copies of the textbook to complete readings offline. All supplemental readings are included in the online course.

Textbook
• Rubenstein, James M.
The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography. 11th ed.
New York: Prentice Hall, 2014.

Supplemental Readings

The course includes a variety of supplementary readings from newspapers, magazines, and journals to expand upon textbook
readings. These supplements highlight real-life examples of geographic concepts while providing greater depth of inquiry.

Additional materials, including case studies, videos, and aerial photos, will be used to supplement primary course materials.

 

AP Environmental Science

Course Description

(NOTE: Chemistry and Biology are prerequisites for this course).

AP Environmental Science is a laboratory and field-based course designed to provide students with the content and skills needed to understand the various interrelationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, and to propose and examine solutions to these problems. Since this is an online course the laboratory and field-based activities will be done virtually and via experiments that students can easily perform at home with common materials. The course is intended to be the equivalent of a one-semester college ecology course, which is taught over an entire year in high school. The course encompasses human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law.

Course Materials

Textbooks
Author: Daniel B. Botkin and Edward A. Keller
Title: Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet (7th ed.).
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Year: 2007

Supplemental Websites:
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com 
Description: A compilation of resources, criticisms, suggestions, and texts that are helpful in teaching APstudents.

Course Goals

Students should be able to demonstrate:

  • Use of scientific method in the field of environmental science as the process to understand the interconnections of the Earth’s systems
  • Recognize how natural systems change over time and space; also how human impact alters these natural systems
  • Evaluate scientifically the risks of environmental problems; both natural and man-made
  • Propose methods of preventing, reducing risk, managing, or solving environmental problems
  • Experience laboratory activities to enhance scientific exploration of environmental science
AP Psychology

Course Description

The AP Psychology course introduces students to the scientific study of the behaviors and mental processes of human beings.

Students will study a wide range of topics, including the history and approaches of psychology, research methods, behavior and learning, personality, and abnormal behavior and its treatment. Over the course of study, students will create a biography book detailing the contributions of important figures in the field. In addition, students will be exposed to a wide variety of activities, readings, and research studies during the course.

Course Materials

In addition to the online materials, students will need copies of both books listed below.

Course Textbook and Resources:
Myers, David G. Myers
Psychology for AP®, 2nd ed.
New York: Worth Publishers, 2014

Hock, Roger R. Forty
Studies That Changed Psychology, 7th ed.
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2012.

AP World History

Course Description

AP® World History is a yearlong college-level course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP)World History Exam. The goal of this course is to explore historical themes common to societies around the world and across time periods, from prehistory to the present day. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay-writing, interpretation of original documents, and historiography. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, document-based questions, project-based activities, and practice exams.

Course Materials

Textbook
Strayer, Robert W. Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP. 2nd ed.
Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013.

Reader
Reilly, Kevin.
Worlds of History, Volume I: To 1550, A Comparative Reader. 5th ed.
Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013.

Reilly, Kevin.
Worlds of History, Volume II: Since 1400, A Comparative Reader. 5th ed.
Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013.

Primary sources

Students will read and analyze selected primary sources included in Strayer and Reilly, as well as individual selections from a wide variety of other sources. See course outline below for specific selections.

Secondary sources

Beard, Mary R.
Women as a Force in History: A Study in Traditions and Realities.
Persea Books, 1987.

Hochschild, Adam.
King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa.
Houghton Mifflin, 1999.

Kelly-Gadol, Joan.
“Did Women have a Renaissance”, from Women, History, and Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly-Gadol.

Wiesner-Hanks, Merry E., et. al.
Discovering the Global Past: A Look at the Evidence, Vol. I.
Cengage Learning, 2011.

Other works of historical interpretation used in the course are taken from Reilly. See course outline below for specific selections.

General Electives

Introduction to Art

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL1086
Grade Level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, Intro to Art encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, this full-year course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.

Course Objectives

  • Explain how art is used to express commemoration, documentation, and narration
  • Identify how the religious beliefs of different cultures are conveyed in art
  • Discuss the importance of the visual elements and describe their symbolic expression in
    works of art
  • Classify one-point, two-point, and multiple-point perspectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of design by describing how artists use balance, rhythm, and movement in their work
  • Define social documentation, photo essay, and photojournalism, and identify the impact they
    have on society
  • Explain why art history has a powerful place in culture today

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Art Defined
Unit 2: Visual Elements of Art
Unit 3: The Principles: Language of Art
Unit 4: Two-Dimensional Art
Unit 5: Photography, Film, Video, and Digital Imagery
Unit 6: Three-Dimensional Art and Media: Part One
Unit 7: Three-Dimensional Art and Media: Part Two
Unit 8: Intro to Art History: Prehistoric and Ancient Art
Unit 9: Intro to Art History: Ancient Art in Different Cultures

Contemporary Health (full year)

EL3404
Course Overview and Syllabus
Grade level: 9–12
Credits: 1.0
Prerequisite courses: none

Course Description

This year-long course designed for high school students examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships, and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine the practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe health practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, and to devise healthy nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws.

The Contemporary Health course does cover sensitive topics such as sexual intercourse, contraception, sex and gender, pregnancy, sexual harassment, physical violence, emotional abuse, sexually transmitted infections, and substance use and abuse.

Course Objectives

You will meet the following goals by taking this course:

  • Describe the effects of alcohol, nicotine, tobacco, and drug use on the human body.
  • Explain the social and legal implications of using alcohol, nicotine, tobacco, and drugs.
  • Describe the characteristics of a nutritionally balanced diet, and why maintaining a healthy weight and body composition is important.
  • Identify individual differences in gender identity and in sexual orientation.
  • Identify the effects of sexually transmitted infections, and methods for avoiding or reducing the risk contracting one.
  • Describe characteristics of good mental and emotional health, the relationship between stress and physical and social health, and strategies for coping with stress.
  • Identify character traits that promote healthy relationships.
  • Identify the causes, symptoms, and risk factors related to communicable and noncommunicable diseases, and strategies to detect, treat, and prevent diseases.
  • Explain how to respond responsibly when an injury occurs and the consequences of serious injuries.
  • Explain the effects of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and molestation.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.

Scope and Sequence

When you log on to Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are listed below:
Unit 1: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
Unit 2: Nutrition and Physical Activity
Unit 3: Growth, Development, and Sexual Health
Unit 4: Mental and Emotional Health
Unit 5: Building Healthy Relationships
Unit 6: Personal and Community Health
Unit 7: Injury Prevention and Safety

Online Learning and Digital Citizenship

Course Description

In this one-semester course, students develop essential study skills for academic success, such as staying organized, managing time, taking notes, applying reading strategies, writing strong papers, and researching and properly citing information. Explicit modeling and ample practice are provided for each study skill to support student mastery. Instruction on how to be a responsible online learner is threaded throughout the course, and these skills are directly addressed in lessons on cyberbullying, staying safe online, and learning how to be a digital leader. A basic understanding of software and hardware and how to troubleshoot common technology issues are also taught. By the end of the course, students will have the tools they need to be academically successful in both traditional and digital learning environments.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Analyze how motivation affects learning.
  • Recognize the characteristics of cyberbullying.
  • Create citations for various sources.
  • Analyze effective ways to prepare for a test.
  • Compare and contrast different methods for taking notes.
  • Organize ideas to create a strong paragraph.
  • Apply a variety of reading strategies to comprehend text.
  • Create a presentation using design principles.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics. The units of study are:
Unit 1: Owning Your Academic Success
Unit 2: Learning Online
Unit 3: Reading and Note Taking
Unit 4: Researching Online
Unit 5: Writing and Presenting
Unit 6: Studying and Test Taking

Strategies for Academic Success

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL1187
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Compare different types of motivation and explain how motivation affects academics
  • Understand the concept of academic integrity, and define cheating as it relates to online learning
  • Identify different types of organizers, and describe the purposes of each
  • Describe different strategies for remembering information
  • List and explain each of the five steps of test preparation
  • Explain the importance of following a rubric
  • Describe the benefits of creating study groups, and distinguish the characteristics of quality study groups

Scope and Sequence

When you log into the Virtual Classroom, you can view the entire course map, which provides a scope and sequence of all topics you will study. Clicking a lesson’s link in the course map leads to a page listing instructional activities, assignments, and learning objectives specific to that lesson. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Taking Control of My Academic Success
Unit 2: Your Online Learning Experience
Unit 3: Taking High-Quality Notes
Unit 4: Memorization Techniques
Unit 5: Five Steps to Test Preparation
Unit 6: Test-Taking Strategies
Unit 7: The Benefits of Visual Aids
Unit 8: Using References
Unit 9: Quality Final Products
Unit 10: Strategies for Academic Success
Unit 11: Reading Techniques

Art History I

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL4002
Grade Level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, Art History I offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this full-year course will cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art through modern art in Europe and the Americas.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Examine the effects of major historical events on culture and art
  • Compare and contrast art from different world regions
  • Identify major contributions artists have made to architecture
  • Describe the different art movements throughout history
  • Analyze a variety of artworks

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Art History: Middle Ages – Early Europe
Unit 2: Art History: Renaissance Period
Unit 3: Art History: High Renaissance and Baroque
Unit 4: Art History: World Art After 1200
Unit 5: Art History: 18th and 19th Century Art in Europe and the Americas
Unit 6: Art History: Modern Art – Part One
Unit 7: Art History: Modern Art – Part Two

Healthy Living

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL2081
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

Encouraging students to make responsible, respectful, informed, and capable decisions about topics that affect the well-being of themselves and others, this course is a one-semester course that provides students with comprehensive information they can use to develop healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Designed for high school students, this informative and engaging course encourages students to recognize that they have the power to choose healthy behaviors to reduce risks.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Examine how various types of pollution affect local communities and the world
  • Identify characteristics of good mental and emotional health
  • Develop speaking, listening, and nonverbal communication skills necessary for building healthy relationships
  • Describe how sources of conflict, violence, and abuse can be minimized
  • Assess nutritional needs based on dietary guidelines and the food guide pyramid
  • Summarize the effects of tobacco use on family, finances, and society and the effects of alcoholism on families and society
  • Describe the role of medicine in health promotion, disease prevention, and possible complications that may arise from taking them
  • Identify community resources available to help treat and prevent the spread of communicable diseases

Scope and Sequence

When you log into the Virtual Classroom, you can view the entire course map, which provides a scope and sequence of all topics you will study. Clicking a lesson’s link in the course map leads to a page listing instructional activities, assignments, and learning objectives specific to that lesson. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Health and Wellness Basics
Unit 2: Mental and Emotional Health
Unit 3: Family and Social Health
Unit 4: Nutrition and Physical Activity
Unit 5: Growth and Development
Unit 6: Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drugs
Unit 7: Diseases and Disorders

Psychology

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL2084
Grade level: 11–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

This two-semester course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Compare and contrast the field of psychology with other social and physical sciences
  • List and explain the goals of psychological research
  • Describe social learning and discuss factors that influence socially learned behavior
  • Define sensation and describe the study of psychophysics
  • Identify brain structures and various factors influencing memory formation
  • Summarize the nature versus nurture debate
  • Define personality and discuss environmental and biological influences on personality
  • Compare and contrast the medical and biopsychosocial perspectives of psychological disorders
  • Identify important factors in the formation and maintenance of close relationships

Scope and Sequence

When you log into the Virtual Classroom, you can view the entire course map, which provides a scope and sequence of all topics you will study. Clicking a lesson’s link in the course map leads to a page listing instructional activities, assignments, and learning objectives specific to that lesson. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Psychology: History, Perspectives, and Research
Unit 2: Psychology and the Body: Biology,
Sensation, Perception, and Consciousness
Unit 3: Being Human: The Nature of Human Experience
Unit 4: Becoming Human: Motivation, Emotion, Development, and Personality
Unit 5: Disorders: Classification and Treatment
Unit 6: Social Psychology: The Science of Human Interaction

Foundations or Personal Wellness

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL2082
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

Exploring a combination of health and fitness concepts, this comprehensive and cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Offered as a two-semester course designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Analyze how factors such as heredity, environment, and culture affect health
  • Describe how individuals can address health problems and endorse health advocacy through education
  • Evaluate myths associated with weight training
  • Describe the functions and structures of the different systems of the body
  • Analyze the relationship between nutrition, health, and wellness
  • Summarize how human life begins from conception through the stages of development

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Health and Wellness Basics
Unit 2: Fitness and the Body
Unit 3: Health Maintenance
Unit 4: Healthy Behaviors

Contemporary Health (semester)

EL3404 IC
Course Overview and Syllabus
Grade level: 9–12
Credits: .5
Prerequisite courses: none

Course Description

This semester-long course designed for high school students examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships, and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle.

Throughout the course, students examine the practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe health practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, and to devise healthy nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws.

The Contemporary Health course does cover sensitive topics such as sexual intercourse, contraception, sex and gender, pregnancy, sexual harassment, physical violence, emotional abuse, sexually transmitted infections, and substance use and abuse.

Course Objectives

You will meet the following goals by taking this course:

  • Describe the effects of alcohol, nicotine, tobacco, and drug use on the human body.
  • Explain the social and legal implications of using alcohol, nicotine, tobacco, and drugs.
  • Describe the characteristics of a nutritionally balanced diet, and why maintaining a healthy weight and body composition is important.
  • Identify individual differences in gender identity and in sexual orientation.
  • Identify the effects of sexually transmitted infections, and methods for avoiding or reducing the risk contracting one.
  • Describe characteristics of good mental and emotional health, the relationship between stress and physical and social health, and strategies for coping with stress.
  • Identify character traits that promote healthy relationships.
  • Identify the causes, symptoms, and risk factors related to communicable and noncommunicable diseases, and strategies to detect, treat, and prevent diseases.
  • Explain how to respond responsibly when an injury occurs and the consequences of serious injuries.
  • Explain the effects of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and molestation.
  • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.

Scope and Sequence

When you log on to Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are listed below:

Unit 1: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs Unit 2: Nutrition and Physical Activity
Unit 3: Growth, Development, and Sexual Health
Unit 4: Mental and Emotional Health
Unit 5: Building Healthy Relationships
Unit 6: Personal and Community Health
Unit 7: Injury Prevention and Safety

Lifetime Fitness

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL2083
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

Exploring fitness topics such as safe exercise and injury prevention, nutrition and weight management, consumer product evaluation, and stress management, this course equips high school students with the skills they need to achieve lifetime fitness. Throughout this one-semester course, students assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Personal fitness assessments encourage students to design a fitness program to meet their individual fitness goals.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Describe the importance of physical fitness for all ages and abilities
  • Describe common exercise-related physical injuries, and list guidelines for preventing injuries during physical activity
  • Identify diseases that can affect the different systems of the body, and recognize the relationship between stress and disease
  • Identify team sports that achieve health-related fitness goals both in school and outside of school
  • Describe how people react to stress physically, emotionally, and behaviorally
  • Discuss the educational requirements for different careers in the fitness and wellness industry

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Beginning Fitness
Unit 2: Heath-Related Fitness
Unit 3: Skills for Lifelong Fitness

Sociology

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL1120
Grade level: 11–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior,
both historically and in modern times.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Identify the factors that account for variations among and within cultures
  • Outline the basic values that form the foundation of American culture and describe the new values that have developed in the
  • United States since the 1970s
  • Describe how the composition of the labor force in the United States has changed throughout history
  • Identify the principal types of crime in the United States, and describe the characteristics of the American criminal-justice system
  • Explain how different motivations and cultural values influence the American class system
  • Describe the characteristics that distinguishes minority groups from one another
  • Describe the characteristics of the capitalist and the socialist economic systems, and outline the developments that have transformed the American economic system
  • Compare and contrast the views of sociologists concerning education, and identify some of
    the current issues in American education

Scope and Sequence

When you log into the Virtual Classroom, you can view the entire course map, which provides a scope and sequence of all topics you will study. Clicking a lesson’s link in the course map leads to a page listing instructional activities, assignments, and learning objectives specific to that lesson. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: The Sociological Point of View
Unit 2: Cultural Diversity
Unit 3: Cultural Conformity and Adaptation
Unit 4: Social Structure
Unit 5: Socializing the Individual
Unit 6: The Adolescent in Society
Unit 7: The Adult in Society
Unit 8: Deviance and Social Control
Unit 9: Social Stratification
Unit 10: Radical and Ethnic Relations
Unit 11: Gender, Age, and Health
Unit 12: The Family
Unit 13: The Economy and Politics
Unit 14: Education and Religion

World Languages

HS Spanish I

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
Prerequisites: None

Course Description

Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Spanish I course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Spanish
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS French I

Materials: French-English dictionary is recommended
Prerequisites: None

Course Description

Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters.

The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set
forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).
Course length: Two semesters

 

Overall Course Objectives

The High School French I course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic French
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

HS German I

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Langenscheidt’s Standard German Dictionary
Prerequisites: None

Course Description

Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on
the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School German I course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic German
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

HS Chinese I

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: though not required, students may wish to purchase a Chinese-English dictionary
Prerequisites: None

Course Description

Students begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Chinese I course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases (in both Pinyin and Chinese characters)
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Chinese (including Pinyin and Chinese characters)
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries
  • Write and input Chinese characters
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS Latin I

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description

Students begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Latin I course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Latin
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of ancient Roman culture.
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS Spanish II

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
Prerequisites: WLG100: Spanish I, Middle School Spanish 1 and 2, or equivalent

Course Description

Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The course exemplifies a marriage of the best in language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set
forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Spanish II course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Spanish
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS French II

Course Description

Students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School French II course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts.
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in French
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS German II

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Langenscheidt’s Standard German Dictionary
Prerequisites: WLG120: German I, Middle School German 1 and 2, or equivalent

Course Description

Students continue their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School German II course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts.
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in German
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS Chinese II

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: though not required, students may wish to purchase a Chinese-English dictionary
Prerequisites: WLG140: Chinese I, Middle School Chinese 1 and 2, or equivalent

Course Description

Students continue their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Chinese II course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases (in both Pinyin and Chinese characters)
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Chinese (including Pinyin and Chinese characters)
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries
  • Write and input Chinese characters
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

HS Latin II

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary
Prerequisites: None

Course Description

Students continue their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days
formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, a notable ancient myth in Latin, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Latin II course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Listen to, and read notable ancient myths in Latin
  • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Latin
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of ancient Roman culture.
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS Spanish III

Course length: Two semesters
Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
Prerequisites: WLG200: Spanish II, or equivalent

Course Description

In this expanding engagement with Spanish, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning.
Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School Spanish III course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue increasingly involved conversations, and respond appropriately to
    increasingly involved, or open conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Spanish
  • Recognize and respond to significant works of literature in Spanish
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
HS French III

Course Description

In this expanding engagement with French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90- day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning.
Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Overall Course Objectives

The High School French III course helps students:

  • Engage in language learning
  • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
  • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
  • Instigate and continue increasingly involved conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly involved, or open conversational prompts
  • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
  • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in French
  • Recognize and respond to significant works of literature in French
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
  • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

Career Education

Audio Engineering

Course Number: EL5716
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

This semester‐long course introduces students to audio engineering. Students learn about the physics of sound, as well as techniques for protecting hearing while working with audio. Students will learn about the history of recording technologies, as well as techniques for evaluating audio hardware, such as microphones and speakers. Students will also learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Using Audacity, an open‐source recording and mixing program, students will practice the techniques used by sound engineers to produce multitrack recordings. Students learn about the difference between proprietary, open‐ source, and free software licenses, as well as the most popular Digital Audio Workspace software used in the profession. Students will also learn about intellectual property issues involving audio, particularly when using other people’s music. Through a series of engaging hands‐on projects, students will learn the fundamental concepts of audio engineering. A series of interviews with professional audio engineers will give students a sense of the opportunities and requirements for pursuing careers in the field.

Course Features

The course provides step‐by‐step instruction on how to use the Audacity recording and mixing software program to complete various audio projects.

  • Audio samples and starter files are provided to help students get started.
  • Audio widgets play back sound to reinforce and illustrate audio‐related concepts.
  • Course graphics and animated images provide another way of understanding complicated course material.
  • Each section of the course includes assignments that have students use what they learned in different ways, including researching and reflecting on audio concepts, as well as editing and creating audio files in different ways.
  • A final assignment pulls together all of the audio‐engineering concepts and techniques students learned in the course to mix together a multitrack sound file.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Course Overview
Unit 2: Understanding Sound
Unit 3: Recording Audio
Unit 4: Audio Software Tools
Unit 5: Mics and Mixing
Unit 6: Mastering Sound

Computer Applications - Office 2016

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL3520
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: none
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

This full year course introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely-used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office® 2016 documents for both personal and professional use in Word® and Excel®. Students will also learn basic features of both Outlook® and PowerPoint®.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Use Microsoft Office to produce a variety of business documents, spreadsheets, presentations and emails.
  • Become proficient in the skills and concepts of Microsoft Word, including working with text, tables, paragraphs and graphics.
  • Learn how to use Microsoft Excel to produce spreadsheets that incorporate complex functions, cell formatting, charts and templates.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Word Basics
Unit 2: Using Word
Unit 3: Excel Basics
Unit 4: Using Excel
Unit 5: Outlook Basics
Unit 6: Tools and Features of Outlook
Unit 7: PowerPoint Basics
Unit 8: Using PowerPoint

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Course Number: EL5724 & EL5725
Grade level: 8–10
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

The Introduction to Entrepreneurship course teaches the skills and key business concepts students need to know to plan and launch a business, whether they are interested in creating a money- making business or a nonprofit to help others. Students learn about real-life teen entrepreneurs; characteristics of successful entrepreneurs; pros and cons of self-employment; sales stages, opportunities and strategies; planning and budgeting; and interpersonal communication in the workplace. Students also learn how to generate business ideas; create a business plan, mission, and vision; promote and market a company; attract investors; manage expenses; and set personal visions and goals. Topics include exploring factors of business success and failure; core business concepts; economic systems; competition; production; the global economy; financing a business; costs, pricing, and accounting; bookkeeping and financial reporting; the role of the government in business; regulations and laws; working with others; and successfully managing employees.

Course Objectives

  • Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:
  • Learn about entrepreneurs and inventors.
  • Learn about products, services, and units of sale.
  • Learn about producers and consumers.
  • Learn about strong and weak economies.
  • Learn about capitalism and competition.
  • Learn about the pros and cons of self-employment.
  • List entrepreneurial characteristics.
  • Learn about profit, value, and loss.
  • Learn about scarcity and the law of supply and demand.
  • Identify factors of production.
  • Explore fields of business activity.
  • List types of consumer goods and services.
  • Learn about distribution methods.
  • Learn about economic utility.
  • Learn about economies and diseconomies of scale.
  • Learn about market saturation.
  • Learn about the stages of the product life cycle.
  • Explore the parts of a business.
  • Identify factors of success and failure.
  • Learn about business ethics, ideas, and opportunities.
  • Learn about business plans and legal structures.
  • Learn about franchising.
  • Learn about trademarks, licenses/permits, and taxes.
  • Learn about DBA names.
  • Learn how to organize a business.
  • Learn about the records needed by small businesses.
  • Learn about purchasing, inventory control, and shipping.
  • Explore factors that affect brand image.
  • Learn about marketing and marketing position.
  • List the five Ps of the marketing mix.
  • Identify promotional methods and costs.
  • Identify product features and benefits.
  • Learn about the use of emotions, desires, fears, and needs in advertising.
  • Learn the components of a marketing plan.
  • Learn about sales quotas and commissions.
  • Learn about variable and fixed costs.
  • Define minimum-selling point and break-even point.
  • Calculate costs per unit.
  • Learn about external pricing factors, and cost-based and retail-based markup.
  • Identify pricing factors and strategies.
  • Learn about price fixing and bait-and-switch advertising.
  • Learn about the importance of personal vision, financial goals, and priorities.
  • Learn about planning and budgeting.
  • Learn about banking, and checking and savings accounts.
  • Learn about bank security and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).
  • Learn about investing, financial risk, diversification, and calculating return on investment (ROI).
  • Learn about credit, credit history, credit scores, and interest rates.
  • Learn about borrowing and lending.Learn about funding sources, cash flow, and forecasting.
  • Learn about risk, risk management, and small business.
  • Learn about business accounting, financial health factors, and bookkeeping.
  • Learn about financial statements.
  • Learn about intellectual property.
  • Learn about taxation, business laws, and regulations.
  • Learn about culture, etiquette, and globalization.
  • Learn about global and domestic trade, importing, exporting, and exchange rates.
  • Assess company needs, and identify ways to find employees.
  • Identify communication skills, including writing, speaking, listening, and negotiating.
  • Identify job search and interviewing skills.
  • Identify positive work qualities and attitudes.
  • Learn about working with others.
  • Learn about management.
  • Learn about the use of technology in the workplace.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:

Part 1
Course Overview
The Role of the Entrepreneur Entrepreneurship as a Career Economic Principles
Production and Delivery
Small Business Basics
Business Ideas and Opportunities Defining Your Business
Business Organization
Marketing Basics
Promoting Your Company

Part 2
Course Overview
Sales
Pricing
Personal Finance
Credit, Funding, and Risk
Accounting
Taxes and Laws
Culture, Globalization, and Technology Workplace Skills

Introduction to Health Science

Course Number: EL3601
Grade level: 10–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 1.0

Course Description

This high school course introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key

elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students will learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the
fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the healthcare field.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Build health science skills that can create the foundations for a health science career
  • Use health science protocols to identify patient needs and appropriate standards of care
  • Identify the organization, purpose, and outcomes of a variety of health care delivery systems
  • Examine the human body to explain its organization, functions, diseases, and disorders

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below.
Unit 1: Health Science Pathways and Careers
Unit 2: Pursuing Health Science Careers
Unit 3: Ethics and Law
Unit 4: Healthcare Systems
Unit 5: Patient Care
Unit 6: Health and Wellness
Unit 7: The Human Body
Unit 8: Safety in the Workplace
Unit 9: First Aid
Unit 10: Communication, Leadership, and Teamwork
Unit 11: Health Science Career Skills
Unit 12: Technology in Health Science

Medical Terminology

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL3620
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: none
Credits: .5

Course Description

This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, including
prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, and singular and plural forms, plus medical
abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical
vocabulary appropriate to healthcare settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human
anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course will
provide students entering the healthcare field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct
instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Identify abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols.
  • Identify the basic structure of medical words.
  • Examine medical and dental dictionaries and multimedia resources and integrate
    resources to interpret technical materials.
  • Interpret, transcribe, and communicate vocabulary related to the health science industry.
  • Translate medical terms to conversational language to facilitate communication.

Scope and Sequence

When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
Unit 1: Medical Terminology
Unit 2: Medical Abbreviations
Unit 3: Pharmaceutical Terms
Unit 4: Anatomical and Physiological Terms
Unit 5: Body Systems Terms I
Unit 6: Body Systems Terms II
Unit 7:Body Systems Terms III

Personal Finance

Course Overview and Syllabus
Course Number: EL3403
Grade level: 9–12
Prerequisite Courses: None
Credits: 0.5

Course Description

This one-semester elective prepares students to navigate personal finance with confidence. The course opens with a study of what it means to be financially responsible, engaging students in
budgeting, planning, and being a smart consumer. Students learn about the relationship between education, employment, income, and net worth, and they plan for the cost of college. Students then broaden their study to include banking, spending, investing, and other money management concepts before exploring credit and debt. In the final unit of the course, students study microeconomics and entrepreneurship, with an overview of economic systems, supply and demand, consumer behavior and incentives, and profit principles. The course concludes with an in-depth case study about starting a business.

Course Objectives

Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

  • Understand what it means to be financially literate
  • Plan for daily and long-term expenditures
  • Understand the cost of credit and the differences between consumer credit and other debt
  • Relate incomes and career choices, understanding the implications of choices you make today on your long-term financial health
  • Learn how to manage your money, including the benefits and risks of investing
  • Gain a basic familiarity with the principles of economics and entrepreneurship

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
    sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Financial Responsibility & Budgeting
    Unit 2: Relating Income & Careers
    Unit 3: Managing Money
    Unit 4: Credit & Debt
    Unit 5: Microeconomics & Entrepreneurship

    Career Explorations

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: CE3401
    Grade level: 6–10
    Prerequisite Courses: None
    Credits: 0.5

    Course Description

    This course prepares middle-school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of students.to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast-paced business environment.

    Course Objectives

    By taking Career Explorations, you will meet the following goals:

    • Research and identify the national career clusters
    • Explore career pathways for each cluster
    • Identify the qualifications, education, and training needed for specific areas
    • Assess personal skills and interests relative to careers and academic goals
    • Develop plans for further exploration and education

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
    sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Career Clusters
    Unit 2: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Careers
    Unit 3: Architecture and Construction Careers
    Unit 4: Arts, A/V Technology, and Communication Careers
    Unit 5: Business, Management, and Administration Careers
    Unit 6: Education and Training Careers
    Unit 7: Energy Careers
    Unit 8: Finance Careers
    Unit 9: Government and Public Administration Careers
    Unit 10: Health Science Careers
    Unit 11: Hospitality and Tourism Careers
    Unit 12: Human Services Careers
    Unit 13: Information Technology Careers
    Unit 14: Law, Public Safety, and Security Careers
    Unit 15: Manufacturing Careers
    Unit 16: Marketing, Sales, and Service Careers
    Unit 17: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Careers
    Unit 18: Transportation and Logistics Careers
    Unit 19: Career Research and Planning

    Digital Arts

    Course Numbers: EL5719 & EL5720
    Grade level: 6–10
    Prerequisite Courses: None
    Credits: 0.5

    Course Description

    The Digital Arts course focuses on building a solid foundation of the basic elements of visual art, then moves on to more advanced principles and elements of art and design. This course teaches core skills using InkscapeTM, a free open-source alternative to Adobe® Illustrator®. Topics include learning processes for evaluating artwork, and identifying selected artists’ works, styles, and historical periods. Students learn 3D space in a 2D environment; filters, gradients and highlights; and methods of working with color. They express themselves creatively in original digital drawings and artwork. By the end of this course, students will have created a unique portfolio of digital artwork, including repeating images to be used as a desktop background, a logo with text, two images scaled proportionally to one another, and a poster image and layout.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Explore a variety of electronic media and techniques.
    • Design and create a complex still-life artwork using the seven elements of art and the eight
      principles of design.
    • Create visual arts using the creative process with the teacher as a mentor, moving toward independence.
    • Create, analyze, and evaluate visual art elements of line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space, as well as visual design principles of repetition, pattern, contrast, variety, movement, rhythm, proportion, balance, emphasis, dominance, unity, and harmony.
    • Study selected artists’ works, styles, and/or historical periods.
    • Create visual artwork that communicates for a specific purpose.
    • Analyze and evaluate how personal aesthetic choices are influenced by and reflected in visual artwork.
    • Review and critique finished artwork and works in progress.
    • Present and produce work and/or performances.
    • Learn about careers in electronic media.
    • Use Inkscape workspace and tools.
    • Learn ways to suggest 3D space in a 2D environment.

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:

    Part 1
    Course Overview
    Introduction to Digital Art Lines
    Shape and Form
    Color
    Value Space Texture

    Part 2
    Course Overview
    Review of Digital Arts I Repetition and Pattern Contrast
    Variety
    Movement and Rhythm Proportion
    Balance
    Emphasis and Dominance Harmony and Unity

    Introduction to Coding

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    
Course Number: EL3702 

    Grade level: 9–12

    Prerequisite Courses: None 

    Credits: 0.5

    Course Description

    Introduction to Coding covers a basic introduction to the principles of programming, including algorithms and logic. Students engage in hands-on programming tasks in the Python programming language as they write and test their own code using the approaches real programmers use in the field. Students will program with variables, functions and arguments, and lists and loops, providing a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills they can use immediately.

    Course Objectives

    • Use software programs that are common in an IT workplace
    • Learn and apply introductory programming skills to solve specific problems
    • Write and test code

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Course Software Installation
    Unit 2: Introduction to Programming
    Unit 3: Writing and Testing Code
    Unit 4: Programming with Lists and Loops

    Health Science Concepts

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: EL3602
    Grade level: 10-12
    Credits: 1.0

    Course Description

    This yearlong course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students will learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students will investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet these goals:

    • Examine the human body to explain its organization and functions
    • Use basic medical terminology to describe health science concepts
    • Understand common diseases and disorders of the body systems
    • Define the stages of human reproduction and development
    • Relate the body systems to their health science career specialties

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: The Human Body and Genetics
    Unit 2: Cells
    Unit 3: Tissues, Organs, and Systems
    Unit 4: Diseases and Disorders
    Unit 5: Anatomy of the Body
    Unit 6: Musculoskeletal System
    Unit 7: Nervous and Sensory Systems
    Unit 8: Cardiovascular System
    Unit 9: Respiratory System
    Unit 10: Integumentary, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems
    Unit 11: Digestive, Urinary, and Endocrine Systems
    Unit 12: Human Reproduction and Development

    Microsoft Office Specialist - Office 2016

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: EL3502
    Grade level: 9–12
    Prerequisite Courses: none
    Credits: 1.0

    Course Description

    This two-semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft® Office® 2016 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, Outlook®, and Access®. By the end of the course, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Use Microsoft® Office® to produce a variety of business documents, spreadsheets, and emails.
    • Become proficient in the skills and concepts of Microsoft® Word®, including working with text, tables, paragraphs, and graphics.
    • Learn how to use Microsoft® Excel® to produce spreadsheets that incorporate complex functions, cell formatting, charts, and templates.
    • Use Microsoft® Outlook® to send e-mail messages and create events and tasks.
    • Use Microsoft® PowerPoint® to create presentations
    • Use Microsoft® Access® to create queries, create and use macros, and understand advanced database management.

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Word Basics
    Unit 2: Using Word
    Unit 3: Tools and Features of Word
    Unit 4: Excel Basics
    Unit 5: Using Excel
    Unit 6: Tools and Features of Excel
    Unit 7: Outlook Basics
    Unit 8: Tools and Features of Outlook
    Unit 9: PowerPoint Basics
    Unit 10: Tools and Features of PowerPoint
    Unit 11: Access Basics
    Unit 12: Using Access

    Pharmacy Technician

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: EL3630
    Grade level: 10–12
    Credits: 1.0

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Describe the role of the Pharmacy Technician
      Identify key aspects of the pharmacy environment
    • List and describe body systems and the drugs used to treat illnesses
    • Classify various drugs
    • Understand how pharmacy laws impact pharmacy work
    • Know how to interpret and process prescriptions
    • Perform pharmacy calculations related to measurements, dilutions, dosages, and conversions
    • Analyze inventory management systems and duties
    • Know how to maintain current patient records

    Student Expectations

    This course requires the same level of commitment from you as a traditional classroom course would. Throughout this course, you are expected to spend approximately five to seven hours per week online on the following activities:

    • Interactive lessons that include a mixture of instructional segments and tasks
    • Assignments in which you apply and extend learning in each lesson
    • Assessments, including tests and cumulative exams

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Pharmacy Technician Roles
    Unit 2: Pharmacy Environments
    Unit 3: Pharmacology
    Unit 4: Drugs and Body Systems Part I
    Unit 5: Drugs and Body Systems Part II
    Unit 6: Classifications
    Unit 7: Prescriptions
    Unit 8: Calculations, Routes, and Formulations
    Unit 9: Parenterals and Admixtures
    Unit 10: Compounding
    Unit 11: Pharmacy Law
    Unit 12: Inventory Management
    Unit 13: Pharmacy Management

    Career Planning and Development

    EL4222
    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Grade level: 9–12
    Credits: 0.5
    Prerequisite courses: none

    Course Description

    Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This one-semester course includes lessons in which students create a self assessment profile, a cover letter, and a résumé that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.

    Course Objectives

    You will meet the following goals by taking this course:

    • Evaluate the business cycle and determine its effect on employment
    • List components of a job application and explain how to complete an application properly
    • Describe rules and procedures for maintaining a safe work environment and explain how to respond effectively to workplace emergencies
    • Explain the importance of good communication in a workplace and identify methods for improving communication skills
    • Summarize how technology is transforming the workplace
    • Describe how copyright laws affect the use of technology

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log on to Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
    sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are listed below:
    Unit 1: Exploring Careers
    Unit 2: Entering the Workforce
    Unit 3: Succeeding in the Workforce
    Unit 4: Developing Professional Skills

    Game Design

    Course Overview and Syllabus

    Course Number: EL5727
    Grade level: 9–12 Prerequisite
    Courses: None
    Credits: 0.5

    Course Description

    This one‐semester course is intended for students who love gaming and want to design and build original games from beginning to end. Students will learn how to use Multimedia Fusion 2, a popular game design software program, to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of genres. In addition, students will get a solid foundation in the basic concepts of game development. By the end of this course, students will have a variety of polished games ready for a game‐development portfolio. Step‐by‐step instruction guides students through various game‐design projects as they learn how to use Multimedia Fusion 2. Each section of the course is followed by an assignment that builds upon the skills students learned in that section. In each assignment, students will use the skills learned in the step‐by‐step instruction to customize the look and feel of each section’s game.

    Course Features

    Multimedia Fusion 2 is flexible enough to create a variety of game genres. If students own a copy of the program after the course is complete, they can continue using it to make video games.

    Multimedia Fusion 2 provides a library of pixel graphics and sound files for use in building games.

    Student work results in executable .exe files that can be shared with fellow students, friends, or family.

    Once students become familiar with the software, additional assignments allow them to build on the techniques learned by customizing the look and sound of the basic course projects.

    Practice pages throughout the course help to reinforce conceptual content as students’ progress through the course. Feedback ensures that students know if they’ve answered the questions correctly.

    Questionnaires with professionals in the game industry ground the course material in a real‐ world context.

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Course Overview
    Unit 2: Project 1: Ping
    Unit 3: Project 2: Ice Breakers
    Unit 4: Project 3: Cat Burglar
    Unit 5: Project 4: Alien Attack
    Unit 6: Project 5: Pest Busters
    Unit 7: Project 6: Amazon Adventures

    Introduction to Business

    Course Number: EL5724 & EL5725
    Grade level: 8–10
    Prerequisite Courses: None
    Credits: 0.5

    Course Description

    The Introduction to Entrepreneurship course teaches the skills and key business concepts students need to know to plan and launch a business, whether they are interested in creating a money- making business or a nonprofit to help others. Students learn about real-life teen entrepreneurs; characteristics of successful entrepreneurs; pros and cons of self-employment; sales stages, opportunities and strategies; planning and budgeting; and interpersonal communication in the workplace. Students also learn how to generate business ideas; create a business plan, mission, and vision; promote and market a company; attract investors; manage expenses; and set personal visions and goals. Topics include exploring factors of business success and failure; core business concepts; economic systems; competition; production; the global economy; financing a business; costs, pricing, and accounting; bookkeeping and financial reporting; the role of the government in business; regulations and laws; working with others; and successfully managing employees.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Learn about entrepreneurs and inventors.
    • Learn about products, services, and units of sale.
    • Learn about producers and consumers.
    • Learn about strong and weak economies.
    • Learn about capitalism and competition.
    • Learn about the pros and cons of self-employment.
    • List entrepreneurial characteristics.
    • Learn about profit, value, and loss.
    • Learn about scarcity and the law of supply and demand.
    • Identify factors of production.
    • Explore fields of business activity.
    • List types of consumer goods and services.
    • Learn about distribution methods.
    • Learn about economic utility.
    • Learn about economies and diseconomies of scale.
    • Learn about market saturation.
    • Learn about the stages of the product life cycle.
    • Explore the parts of a business.
    • Identify factors of success and failure.
    • Learn about business ethics, ideas, and opportunities.
    • Learn about business plans and legal structures.
    • Learn about franchising.
    • Learn about trademarks, licenses/permits, and taxes.
    • Learn about DBA names.
    • Learn how to organize a business.
    • Learn about the records needed by small businesses.
    • Learn about purchasing, inventory control, and shipping.
    • Explore factors that affect brand image.
    • Learn about marketing and marketing position.
    • List the five Ps of the marketing mix.
    • Identify promotional methods and costs.
    • Identify product features and benefits.
    • Learn about the use of emotions, desires, fears, and needs in advertising.
    • Learn the components of a marketing plan.
    • Learn about sales quotas and commissions.
    • Learn about variable and fixed costs.
    • Define minimum-selling point and break-even point.
    • Calculate costs per unit.
    • Learn about external pricing factors, and cost-based and retail-based markup.
    • Identify pricing factors and strategies.
    • Learn about price fixing and bait-and-switch advertising.
    • Learn about the importance of personal vision, financial goals, and priorities.
    • Learn about planning and budgeting.
    • Learn about banking, and checking and savings accounts.
    • Learn about bank security and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).
    • Learn about investing, financial risk, diversification, and calculating return on investment (ROI).
    • Learn about credit, credit history, credit scores, and interest rates.
    • Learn about borrowing and lending.
    • Learn about funding sources, cash flow, and forecasting.
    • Learn about risk, risk management, and small business.
    • Learn about business accounting, financial health factors, and bookkeeping.
    • Learn about financial statements.
    • Learn about intellectual property.
    • Learn about taxation, business laws, and regulations.
    • Learn about culture, etiquette, and globalization.
    • Learn about global and domestic trade, importing, exporting, and exchange rates.
    • Assess company needs, and identify ways to find employees.
    • Identify communication skills, including writing, speaking, listening, and negotiating.
    • Identify job search and interviewing skills.
    • Identify positive work qualities and attitudes.
    • Learn about working with others.
    • Learn about management.
    • Learn about the use of technology in the workplace.
    • Scope and Sequence
    • When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study.
    • The units of study are summarized below:  

    Course Overview

    • The Role of the Entrepreneur Entrepreneurship as a Career Economic Principles
    • Production and Delivery
    • Small Business Basics
    • Business Ideas and Opportunities Defining Your Business
    • Business Organization
    • Marketing Basics
    • Promoting Your Company Part 2
    • Course Overview
    • Sales
    • Pricing
    • Personal Finance
    • Credit, Funding, and Risk
    • Accounting
    • Taxes and Laws
    Intro to Information Technology

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: EL3701
    Grade level: 10–12
    Prerequisite Courses: None
    Credits: 1.0

    Course Description

    This course introduces students to the essential technical and professional skills required in the field of Information Technology (IT). Through hands-on projects and written assignments, students gain an understanding of the operation of computers, computer networks, Internet fundamentals, programming, and computer support. Students also learn about the social impact of technological change and the ethical issues related to technology. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the field of IT.

    Course Objectives

    By taking the combined sequence of Introduction to Information Technology A and B, you will meet the following goals:

    • Use software programs that are common in an IT workplace
    • Explore IT career paths and assess your personal aptitudes
    • Investigate the history and role of hardware and software in IT
    • Learn and apply introductory programming skills to solve specific
    • Examine the legal, ethical, social, and technical issues surrounding networks and the Internet

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Information Technology
    Unit 2: General Workplace Skills
    Unit 3: IT and Computer Hardware
    Unit 4: Networks and the Internet
    Unit 5: Operating Systems and Application Software
    Unit 6: HTML and the Web
    Unit 7: Spreadsheets and Presentations
    Unit 8: Create Multimedia
    Unit 9: Databases
    Unit 10: Introduction to Programming
    Unit 11: Write and Test Code
    Unit 12: Program with Lists and Loops

    Nursing Assistant

    Course Overview and Syllabus
    Course Number: EL3610
    Grade level: 10–12
    Credits: 1.0

    Course Description

    This two-semester course prepares students to provide and assist with all aspects of activities of daily living and nursing care for the adult patient in hospital, long-term care, and home settings. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students are taught the basics of nurse assisting, including interpersonal skills, medical terminology, care procedures, legal and ethical responsibilities, safe and efficient work, gerontology, nutrition, emergency skills, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course from an approved program prepares the student for state certification for employment as a Nursing Assistant.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Describe the role of the Nursing Assistant in the healthcare environment
    • Know the legal and ethical responsibilities specific to nurse assisting
    • Perform patient care procedures
    • Perform physical comfort and safety functions specific to nurse assisting
    • Perform activities of daily living (ADLs)
    • Analyze effective techniques for communicating with a diverse patient population
    • Understand the principles of immobility and patient positioning
    • Know how to maintain patient dignity and provide culturally sensitive care

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Nurse Assisting
    Unit 2: Legal and Ethical Aspects
    Unit 3: Physiologic Aspects
    Unit 4: Psychosocial Aspects
    Unit 5: Infections and Infection Control
    Unit 6: Safety and Emergencies
    Unit 7: Communication
    Unit 8: Activities of Daily Living
    Unit 9: Mobility and Positioning
    Unit 10: Common Procedures
    Unit 11: Optional Procedures

    Middle School GCVS Flex Classes

    English Language Arts

    English Language Arts 6

    Course Description

    This course eases students’ transition to middle school with engaging, age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students learn to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence to support ideas as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts and explore a full unit on Lewis Carroll’s classic novel Through the Looking Glass. Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice.

    Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read, In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Read complex texts at grade level.
    • Understand and analyze the structure and elements of literature from various genres.
    • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
    • Use text evidence to analyze, infer, and synthesize ideas.
    • Engage in routine writing in response to texts read and analyzed.
    • Use the writing process to complete a variety of essay writing assignments.
    • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from several sources.
    • Gain the tools for speaking and listening in discussions and presentations.
    • Learn a variety of real-world and digital communication skills.

    Scope and Sequence

    There are 12 units of study grouped by the quarterly themes of Identity, Perseverance, Heroism, and Community.

    Unit 1: Fitting In
    Unit 2: Making Changes
    Unit 3: That’s Pretty Clever!
    Unit 4: Making Sense
    Unit 5: Planning and Building
    Unit 6: New Beginnings
    Unit 7: Overcoming Obstacles
    Unit 8: Growing Up
    Unit 9: Caretakers of the Earth
    Unit 10: What’s Out There?
    Unit 11: Making Tough Choices
    Unit 12: Understanding Others

    Literacy and Comprehension I

    Course Description

    Literacy and Comprehension I is one of two semester-long intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Read a variety of texts from discrete fields and apply strategies to readings
    • Learn and practice the writing process from idea development to revision
    • Apply language skills across all areas and fields
    • Strengthen vocabulary skills to help contextualize meaning
    • Develop analytical media literacy skills applicable to various genres

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Literacy and Comprehension: An Introduction
    Unit 2: The Environment: Extreme Weather
    Unit 3: The Animals: Amazing
    Unit 4: The Arts: World Artists Discovered
    Unit 5: Technology: The World of Gaming
    Unit 6: The Medical Field: Mystery Illnesses Through the Ages
    Unit 7: The Stories We Spin: Ancient and Modern Myths Uncovered
    Unit 8: Engineering Today: The Challenge – Transportation

    English Language Arts 7

    Course Description

    Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle-school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author’s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students complete an in-depth study of Jack London’s classic novel White Fang, and read excerpts from other stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Read complex texts at grade level.
    • Understand and analyze the structure and elements of literature from various genres.
    • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
    • Use text evidence to analyze, infer, and synthesize ideas.
    • Engage in routine writing in response to texts read and analyzed.
    • Use the writing process to complete a variety of essay writing assignments.
    • Develop research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from several sources.
    • Gain the tools for speaking and listening in discussions and presentations.
    • Learn a variety of real-world and digital communication skills.

    Scope and Sequence

    There are 12 units of study grouped by the quarterly themes of Identity, Perseverance, Community, and Heroism.

    Unit 1: Expectations
    Unit 2: Exploring Who We Are
    Unit 3: Heritage
    Unit 4: Focusing on an Objective
    Unit 5: Pursuing the Dream
    Unit 6: Overcoming the Odds
    Unit 7: Neighbors
    Unit 8: Freedom Fighters
    Unit 9: Visions of the Past and Future
    Unit 10: Heroism
    Unit 11: Battling Adversity
    Unit 12: Looking Out for Others

    English Language Arts 8

    Course Description

    In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational text engages students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and sample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Read complex texts at grade level.
    • Understand and analyze the structure and elements of literature from various genres.
    • Increase academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
    • Use text evidence to analyze, infer, and synthesize ideas.
    • Engage in routine writing in response to texts read and analyzed.
    • Use the writing process to complete a variety of essay writing assignments.
    • Develop research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.
    • Gain the tools for speaking and listening in discussions and presentations.
    • Learn a variety of real-world and digital communication skills.

    Scope and Sequence

    There are 12 units of study grouped by the quarterly themes of Heroism, Perseverance, Identity, and Community.

    Unit 1: American Heroes
    Unit 2: Lives of Commitment
    Unit 3: Everyday Heroes
    Unit 4: Rising to the Challenge
    Unit 5: Setting Goals
    Unit 6: Bravery and Resistance
    Unit 7: Belonging
    Unit 8: Rise to the Occasion
    Unit 9: Chance vs. Choice
    Unit 10: Making Communities Safer
    Unit 11: The Promise of America
    Unit 12: Out of Many, One

    Mathematics

    Mathematics 6

    Course Description

    This course begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. They further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. This course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers.

    Students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Apply knowledge of multiplication and division while working with fractions and to solve ratio and rate problems
    • Extend previous notion of the number system to include the entire set of rational numbers
    • Effectively translate between graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
    • Develop an understanding of data distributions and statistical variability
    • Learn to select and use appropriate mathematical knowledge when investigating problems
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the meanings and uses for variables in mathematical problems
    • Work with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Understanding Ratios and Rates
    Unit 2: Applying Ratios and Rates
    Unit 3: Multi-Digit Computation
    Unit 4: Dividing Fractions
    Unit 5: Percent
    Unit 6: Extending the Number System
    Unit 7: Relationships on the Coordinate Plane
    Unit 8: Data Distributions and Analysis
    Unit 9: Variables and Expressions
    Unit 10: Equations and Inequalities
    Unit 11: Area
    Unit 12: Surface Area and Volume

    Pre-Algebra

    Course Description

    This full-year course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Perform operations with rational numbers and use them to simplify expressions
    • Use mathematical and algebraic expressions and equations to represent and solve a variety of mathematical and real-world problems
    • Understand the concept of a function and its use in representing relationships
    • Exercise proportional thinking and use it to analyze the connection between ratio, proportion, and percent
    • Understand geometric concepts and strengthen spatial reasoning
    • Develop and use problem-solving strategies
    • Use statistics to display, describe, and analyze data
    • Understand counting methods, and apply them to calculate probabilities

    Scope and Sequence

    When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and sequence of all topics you will study. The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Number Sense
    Unit 2: Expressions
    Unit 3: Equations and Inequalities
    Unit 4: Ratios, Proportional Relationships, and Percents
    Unit 5: Number Properties
    Unit 6: Analytic Geometry
    Unit 7: Geometry Basics
    Unit 8: Counting and Probability
    Unit 9: Statistics
    Unit 10: Square Roots and Right Triangles
    Unit 11: Two-Dimensional Geometry
    Unit 12: Three-Dimensional Geometry

    Mathematics 7

    Course Description

    This course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning where students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. Students’ number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multistep equations and inequalities. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Apply mathematical reasoning skills and statistical analysis to solve real-world problems.
    • Effectively translate between graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations.
    • Learn to select and use appropriate mathematical knowledge when investigating problems.
    • Apply proportional reasoning, utilizing multiplication and division to solve problems with ratios, rates, and scale factors.
    • Develop a probability model comparing and contrasting theoretical and experimental
      probabilities.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the meanings and uses for variables in mathematical problems.
    • Work with two- and three-dimensional figures to solve problems involving area, surface area,
      and volume.

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Proportional Relationships
    Unit 2: Percents
    Unit 3: Operations with Integers
    Unit 4: Operations with Rational Numbers
    Unit 5: Probability
    Unit 6: Sampling and Comparing Populations
    Unit 7: Expressions
    Unit 8: Equations
    Unit 9: Inequalities
    Unit 10: Two-Dimensional Geometry
    Unit 11: Three-Dimensional Geometry

    Mathematics 8

    Course Description

    The course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations, and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions.

    Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean Theorem, distance, and volume.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Effectively translate between graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal representations
    • Learn to select and use appropriate mathematical knowledge when investigating problems
    • Demonstrate an understanding of functions and use functions to represent quantitative relationships
    • Use linear equations and systems of linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve a
      variety of problems.
    • Analyze two- and three-dimensional figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence
    • Develop and apply foundational mathematical skills such as the application of rational and irrational numbers

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Input-Output Relationships
    Unit 2: Linear Functions
    Unit 3: Writing Equations for LinearRelationships
    Unit 4: Patterns in Bivariate Data
    Unit 5: Linear Equations
    Unit 6: Representing Linear SystemsGraphically
    Unit 7: Algebraic Approaches to LinearSystems
    Unit 8: Transformations
    Unit 9: Congruence and Similarity
    Unit 10: Working with Exponents
    Unit 11: Pythagorean Theorem and Irrational Numbers
    Unit 12: Volume

    Social Studies and History

    Grade 6 Ancient World History

    Course Description

    The MS Ancient World History course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of ancient world history. This year-long course covers ancient peoples, cultures, civilizations, and innovations through approximately 300 CE. Students are introduced to historical inquiry skills for application to studies of ancient civilizations. Students explore physical and human geography to explain how ancient people interacted with the environment and understand how civilizations developed. Students study early economies and how trade relations affected culture and language. In later lessons, students examine how early forms of government and technology have had a lasting influence on modern civilization. Throughout the course, students analyze maps and primary sources to identify patterns and make connections across time and space. Students are exposed to diverse cultures and learn to explore the past with historical empathy. Students encounter rigorous reading and writing activities for a variety of purposes. These activities allow students to develop literacy and writing skills as well as critical thinking and communication skills.

    Course Objectives

    Students will meet the following goals by taking this course:

    • Analyze how the physical environment affected human migration and the development of ancient societies.
    • Investigate the rise and development of ancient civilizations and their political institutions, social structures, cultural characteristics, art and literature, and economies.
    • Examine how major religions and belief systems affected individuals, societies, and
      governments.
    • Explore how technological innovations, such as tools and writing systems, affected the
      development of ancient societies.
    • Consider how trade and technology resulted in the diffusion of cultures across time and space.
    • Apply historical inquiry skills to the study of ancient civilizations.

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are listed below:
    Unit 1: Historical Inquiry Skills
    Unit 2: Early Humankind and the Development of Human Societies
    Unit 3: Ancient Civilizations of Egypt and Kush
    Unit 4: Judaism and the Ancient Hebrews
    Unit 5: The Early Civilizations of India
    Unit 6: The Early Civilizations of China
    Unit 7: Ancient Greece
    Unit 8: Greek Civilization
    Unit 9: The Roman Republic
    Unit 10: The Roman Empire

    Grades 6-8 Civics, Economics, and Government

    Course Description

    Exploring the structure of the United States government on a national, state, and local level, this course challenges students to learn and understand fundamental concepts and philosophies that led to the creation of the United States Constitution. Students enrolled in this two-semester course analyze the political process, political parties, and influences that affect them both. Engaging, interactive content introduces economic concepts and encourages students to explore government and economics on a global scale. By instilling a thorough understanding of government and economics, this course inspires students to investigate what it means to be an American citizen.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Explain what it means to be an American citizen and summarize the duties and responsibilities of citizens
    • Demonstrate key understandings about the U.S. Constitution, including the principles behind it, its importance as the supreme law of the land, its structure, and how it is amended
    • Examine the roles and responsibilities of government, at the federal, state, and local level
    • Compare and contrast the major political parties in the United States and describe the presidential electoral process
    • Examine the principles that underpin the U.S. economic system, and describe the effects of globalization on the world economy
    • Explore a variety of career possibilities and discuss the role of education in providing the skills needed in the job market
    • Use social studies skills to access, interpret, and apply information from a variety of sources

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Introduction to Civics
    Unit 2: The United States Constitution
    Unit 3: Branches of Government
    Unit 4: Government on the State and Local Level
    Unit 5: The Role of the Citizen
    Unit 6: Citizens and the Political Process
    Unit 7: Economics
    Unit 8: Global Government and Economics

    Grade 7 World Cultures and Geography

    Course Description

    Designed to introduce students to the study of geography, this course helps students master important concepts in physical and human geography. Comprehensive and organized by region, this two-semester middle school course helps students understand the Earth’s physical and human diversity.

    Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors across the globe. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world around them. All units in the course are parallel and include studies in physical and human geography, ancient cultures, regional studies, and modern issues.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Examine methods used by geographers to study and compare regions, including the use of demographic data, economic indicators, maps and photographs, cultural characteristics, characteristics of government, and physical features
    • Identify and locate major landforms, bodies of water, countries, and population centers
    • Identify, locate, and describe the Earth’s major climate types and ecosystems
    • Analyze how physical processes change and shape the Earth’s surface
    • Investigate the characteristics of the world’s culture regions, analyze how cultural diffusion occurs, and describe the factors that can cause cultures to change
    • Examine the causes and effects of human modifications on the environment, and discuss modern environmental issues
    • Use social studies skills to access, interpret, and apply information from a variety of sources

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Introduction to History and Geography
    Unit 2: Physical Systems
    Unit 3: Human Systems
    Unit 4: Africa
    Unit 5: The Middle East
    Unit 6: South and Southeast Asia
    Unit 7: Central and East Asia
    Unit 8: Australia and Oceania
    Unit 9: Europe
    Unit 10: Latin America and the Caribbean
    Unit 11: The US and Canada

    Grades 6-8 World History

    Course Description

    Providing students with an opportunity to learn the diverse history that has shaped our world, this course delves into the evolution of civilization from the rise of ancient empires through the 21st century. Middle school students enrolled in this exciting and informative course will investigate the development of medieval societies, the effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation, and the progress made during different periods of revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and reform. Over the course of two semesters, students will analyze effects of political conflicts and social issues on the continuing development and interdependence among nations in the modern world.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Identify and characterize early human civilizations throughout Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas.
    • Explore the creation and evolution of government throughout history from ancient civilizations to present day
    • Analyze the influences of colonialism, imperialism, and religion on various civilizations and societies throughout history
    • Describe various revolutions and movements that have influenced societies including the
      Age of Exploration, the Scientific Revolution, the Age of Enlightenment, and the Renaissance
    • Examine various conflicts throughout world history and how these conflicts have affected various societies.
    • Investigate diverse technologies and the impact that these technologies have had on cultures throughout history

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: Era: The Beginnings of Human Society
    Unit 2: Era: Early Civilizations
    Unit 3: Era: New Empires
    Unit 4: Era: Regional Civilizations
    Unit 5: Era: The Age of Encounters
    Unit 6: Era: An Age of Revolutions
    Unit 7: Era: The Modern World

    Grade 8 U.S. History

    Course Description

    The Survey of US History course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States. This year-long course surveys the major events and turning points of US history as it moves from the era of exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped US history. In early units, students will explore the geography of the nation and world, as well as assess the foundations of US democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization as they assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives. Rigorous reading and writing activities carefully address Common Core literacy standards and guide students toward the development of critical thinking and communication skills.

    Course Objectives

    You will meet the following goals by taking this course: • Assess the political development of the United States, including the influence of democratic ideals, the changing role of government, and the development of the modern two-party system. • Explore the evolution of American culture and society, including the role of reform movements, from the colonial era to the present. • Investigate and understand the reasons behind American involvement in wars and conflicts throughout US history. • Trace the economic development of the United States from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy to the leading economic force in the world. • Use research skills to access, interpret, and apply information from multiple sources.

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are listed below:
    Unit 1: Geography and Colonialism
    Unit 2: Creating a New Nation
    Unit 3: Civil War and Reconstruction
    Unit 4: Industrialization and Its Effects
    Unit 5: The United States at the Turn of the Century
    Unit 6: The Roaring 20s and the Great Depression
    Unit 7: World War II
    Unit 8: Postwar America
    Unit 9: Shaping of Modern America
    Unit 10: Modern Challenges

    Science

    Life Science

    Course Description

    This full-year middle school course focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Examine the characteristics of living things.
    • Investigate cell structure and cellular processes.
    • Relate the structure and function of DNA to inheritance patterns.
    • Explore the changes in organisms over time.
    • Learn about the diversity of organisms, from bacteria to animals.
    • Analyze how human body systems work together to maintain homeostasis.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of populations and ecosystems.
    • Explain the causes and effects of environmental change.

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Nature of Science
    Unit 2: Living Things
    Unit 3: Cell Biology
    Unit 4: Genetics
    Unit 5: Evolution
    Unit 6: Bacteria to Plants
    Unit 7: Animals
    Unit 8: Human Biology
    Unit 9: Ecology
    Unit 10: Environmental Change

    Earth Science

    Course Description

    Students enrolled in this dynamic course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Earth Science is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for
    understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Describe the formation, identification, and utilization of rocks and minerals
    • Explain methods for measuring geological time
    • Describe the landforms found on Earth and the factors that have caused them to change over time
    • Discuss the importance, availability, and use of Earth’s water supply
    • Describe the use and conservation of resources
    • Explain the impact of weather and climate on various regions of the earth
    • Relate Earth to larger systems like the solar system, galaxies, and the universe

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:
    Unit 1: The Planet Earth
    Unit 2: Changing Earth
    Unit 3: Earth’s Waters
    Unit 4: Weather and Climate
    Unit 5: Astronomy

    Physical Science

    Course Description

    This full-year course focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.

    Course Objectives

    Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

    • Examine the periodic table and determine the properties of an element.
    • Investigate the structures, types, and properties of matter.
    • Learn about chemical bonds and chemical reactions.
    • Explain the relationship between motion and forces.
    • Recognize the interdependence of work and energy.
    • Relate heat and temperature change on the macroscopic level to particle motion on the microscopic level.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of waves, including sound and light.
    • Analyze the connection between electricity and magnetism.

    Scope and Sequence

    The units of study are summarized below:

    Unit 1: Matter
    Unit 2: Atoms, Elements, and the Periodic Table
    Unit 3: Bonding
    Unit 4: Chemical Reactions
    Unit 5: Solutions and Other Mixtures
    Unit 6: Motion and Forces
    Unit 7: Work and Energy
    Unit 8: Temperature and Heat
    Unit 9: Waves and Sound
    Unit 10: Light
    Unit 11: Electricity and Magnetism

    World Languages

    HS Spanish I

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
    Prerequisites: None

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School Spanish I course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
    • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Spanish
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

     

    HS French I

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: French-English dictionary is recommended
    Prerequisites: None

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters.

    The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set
    forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School French I course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
    • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic French
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

     

    HS German I

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: Langenscheidt’s Standard German Dictionary
    Prerequisites: None

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on
    the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School German I course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic German
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

     

    HS Chinese I

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: though not required, students may wish to purchase a Chinese-English dictionary
    Prerequisites: None

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School Chinese I course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases (in both Pinyin and Chinese characters)
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
    • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Chinese (including Pinyin and Chinese characters)
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries
    • Write and input Chinese characters
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
    HS Latin I

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary
    Prerequisites: None

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School Latin I course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in basic Latin
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of ancient Roman culture.
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
    HS Spanish II

    Course length: Two semesters
    Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
    Prerequisites: WLG100: Spanish I, Middle School Spanish 1 and 2, or equivalent

    Course Description

    Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The course exemplifies a marriage of the best in language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set
    forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

    Overall Course Objectives

    The High School Spanish II course helps students:

    • Engage in language learning
    • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
    • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
    • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts
    • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
    • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Spanish
    • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
    • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
      HS French II

      Course length: Two semesters
      Materials: French-English dictionary is recommended
      Prerequisites: WLG110: French I, Middle School French 1 and 2, or equivalent

      Course Description

      Students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

      Overall Course Objectives

      The High School French II course helps students:

      • Engage in language learning
      • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
      • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts.
      • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
      • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in French
      • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
      • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissionsRecurring Content

       

      HS German II

      Course length: Two semesters
      Materials: Langenscheidt’s Standard German Dictionary
      Prerequisites: WLG120: German I, Middle School German 1 and 2, or equivalent

      Course Description

      Students continue their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

      Overall Course Objectives

      The High School German II course helps students:

      • Engage in language learning
      • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
      • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts.
      • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in German
      • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries
      • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

       

      HS Chinese II

      Course length: Two semesters
      Materials: though not required, students may wish to purchase a Chinese-English dictionary
      Prerequisites: WLG140: Chinese I, Middle School Chinese 1 and 2, or equivalent

      Course Description

      Students continue their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

      Overall Course Objectives

      The High School Chinese II course helps students:

      • Engage in language learning
      • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases (in both Pinyin and Chinese characters)
      • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      • Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly nuanced conversational prompts
      • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
      • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Chinese (including Pinyin and Chinese characters)
      • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries
      • Write and input Chinese characters
      • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
      HS Latin II

      Course length: Two semesters
      Materials: Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary
      Prerequisites: None

      Course Description

      Students continue their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days
      formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, a notable ancient myth in Latin, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
      Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

      Overall Course Objectives

      The High School Latin II course helps students:

      • Engage in language learning
      • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases
      • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      • Listen to, and read notable ancient myths in Latin
      • Generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
      • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Latin
      • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of ancient Roman culture.
      • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

       

      HS Spanish III

      Course length: Two semesters
      Materials: Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary
      Prerequisites: WLG200: Spanish II, or equivalent

      Course Description

      In this expanding engagement with Spanish, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning.
      Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

      Overall Course Objectives

      The High School Spanish III course helps students:

      • Engage in language learning
      • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
      • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
      • Instigate and continue increasingly involved conversations, and respond appropriately to
        increasingly involved, or open conversational prompts
      • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
      • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in Spanish
      • Recognize and respond to significant works of literature in Spanish
      • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries
      • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions
        HS French III

        Course length: Two semesters
        Materials: French-English dictionary is recommended
        Prerequisites: WLG210: French II, or equivalent

        Course Description

        In this expanding engagement with French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90- day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning.
        Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

        Overall Course Objectives

        The High School French III course helps students:

        • Engage in language learning
        • Master common and some specialized vocabulary terms and phrases
        • Comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns
        • Instigate and continue increasingly involved conversations, and respond appropriately to increasingly involved, or open conversational prompts
        • Generate language incorporating basic and some specialized vocabulary and a range of grammar patterns
        • Read, write, speak, and listen for meaning in French
        • Recognize and respond to significant works of literature in French
        • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries
        • Regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

         

        General Electives

        Online Learning and Digital Citizenship

        Course Description

        In this one-semester course, students develop essential study skills for academic success, such as staying organized, managing time, taking notes, applying reading strategies, writing strong papers, and researching and properly citing information. Explicit modeling and ample practice are provided for each study skill to support student mastery. Instruction on how to be a responsible online learner is threaded throughout the course, and these skills are directly addressed in lessons on cyberbullying, staying safe online, and learning how to be a digital leader. A basic understanding of software and hardware and how to troubleshoot common technology issues are also taught. By the end of the course, students will have the tools they need to be academically successful in both traditional and digital learning environments.

        Course Objectives

        Throughout the course, you will meet the following goals:

        • Analyze how motivation affects learning.
        • Recognize the characteristics of cyberbullying.
        • Create citations for various sources.
        • Analyze effective ways to prepare for a test.
        • Compare and contrast different methods for taking notes.
        • Organize ideas to create a strong paragraph.
        • Apply a variety of reading strategies to comprehend text.
        • Create a presentation using design principles.

        Scope and Sequence

        When you log into Edgenuity, you can view the entire course map—an interactive scope and
        sequence of all topics. The units of study are:
        Unit 1: Owning Your Academic Success
        Unit 2: Learning Online
        Unit 3: Reading and Note Taking
        Unit 4: Researching Online
        Unit 5: Writing and Presenting
        Unit 6: Studying and Test Taking

        Contact Info

        Greenfield Commonwealth Virtual School

        238 Main Street
        Third Floor

        Greenfield, Mass. 01301

        Phone: 413-475-3879
        Fax: 413-475-3909
        Email: info@gcvs.org

         

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