GCVS Summer Classes

Summer 2019

Summer 2019 Courses

GCVS, the first virtual public school of choice in Massachusetts, proudly offers an array of summer courses to assist students in achieving their goals through credit recovery.* Below is information about specific courses offered.

Register Today to secure your spot. Classes are $175 each for GCVS students and $200 each for all other students. Students may enroll in up to two courses.**

Courses will run June 24th through August 9th***

*Credit Recovery courses are for students who have taken and failed a course and would like to recover the credit through an alternative to repeating an entire class.

**Students may be able to enroll in additional courses on a case-by-case basis and with approval by GCVS.

***Note: If courses are not full, they may be cancelled (and refunds provided).

Course Details

English Language Arts

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 8

In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9

This freshman-year English course engages students in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” They will also study short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10

Focused on application, this sophomore English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analysis, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11

This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12

Students are able to gain credit if they have previously completed this course but did not successfully earn credit. For each unit, students take a diagnostic test that assesses their current knowledge of fundamental content. The results of these tests help students create individualized study plans. Students review the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. The course begins with a look back at events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and imperialism. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students also explore topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world.

Math

MATHEMATICS 8

The course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean theorem, distance, and volume.

PRE-ALGEBRA

This course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in numbers and operations, expressions and equations, ratios and proportions, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

ALGEBRA I

This  course focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students’ understanding of linear and exponential functions and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

GEOMETRY

This course formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the laws of sines and cosines. Moving on to other shapes, students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis.

ALGEBRA II

This course focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically

MATHEMATICS III

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

Science

BIOLOGY
This compelling course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration
of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options
CHEMISTRY

This rigorous course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.

PHYSICS

This course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students solve mathematical problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically about the physical world. The course also includes interactive virtual labs and hands-on lab options, in which students ask questions and create hypotheses.

EARTH SCIENCE

Students enrolled in this dynamic course explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Earth Science is a two-semester course that provides a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and examines how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.

History

SURVEY OF WORLD HISTORY

This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa,
Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

SURVEY OF U.S. HISTORY

Students are able to gain credit if they have previously completed this course but did not successfully earn credit. For each unit, students take a diagnostic test that assesses their current knowledge of fundamental content. The results of these tests help students create individualized study plans. Students review the rise of European nations and the Age of Exploration; the founding of the American colonies; the American Revolution; and the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution. Other topics include the Civil War, migration across the Great Plains, immigration to American shores, and the rise of new ways of manufacturing. Students review the early years of the modern age and the rise of modern cities and our modern political system; the World Wars; the Depression and the New Deal; the Cold War; Vietnam; the opposing ideologies of conservatives and liberals; September 11; and the resultant changes in American foreign and160 domestic policies.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is eligible to take summer courses through GCVS?

To receive credit students must meet the following requirements:

•Students must be Massachusetts residents.

•All courses offered are for credit recovery only, a student must have previously taken a course and failed in order to re-take the course.

•Students can register for up to 2 courses.** The cost of each course is $175 for GCVS students and $200 for all other students.

•Students must have access to a computer and internet connectivity in order to complete a course.

It is the responsibility of the student to confirm transferability of credits with home district.

**Students may be able to enroll in additional courses on a case-by-case basis and with approval by GCVS.

Can a student not attending GCVS take theses summer courses?

Yes. Any student in Massachusetts is eligible to take summer courses through GCVS.

Can courses be paid with a Purchase Order?

Yes. If you are a representative from another school, and have a Purchase Order to pay for the student, please contact GCVS directly at grunyan@gcvs.org or 413-475-3879 ext 40

Will credits through GCVS summer courses transfer?

All courses offered by GCVS meet Massachusetts guidelines. You should talk with your current school Guidance Counselor to ensure the course(s) will satisfy their requirements, and that they will accept the credits.

How much do summer courses through GCVS cost?

For current GCVS students, each course is $175.
For non-GCVS students, each course is $200.

How many summer courses can a student take?

Each student may take a maximum of 2 (two) summer courses.**

**Students may be able to enroll in additional courses on a case-by-case basis and with approval by GCVS.

Are all summer courses online?

Yes, GCVS is a virtual school, and all courses, including summer, are provided online.

Students must have access to a computer and internet in order to complete a course.